pesticide

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pesticide

 [pes´tĭ-sīd]
a poison used to destroy pests of any sort.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd),
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

(pĕs′tĭ-sīd′)
n.
A substance or agent used to kill pests, such as unwanted or harmful insects, rodents, or weeds.

pes′ti·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

pesticide

Toxicology An annihilator of ambient arachnids, antagonistic arthropods, abominable animacules or pugnacious plants–eg, fumigants, fungicides, herbicides, insecticides; most are toxic and potentially fatal, with high arsenical or organophosphate content, and store in adipose tissue, given their lipid solubility Types Organochlorines-eg, DDT, chlordane, mirex, organophosphates–eg, parathion, diazinon, carbamates–eg, Aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran, metals–eg, copper, tributyl-tin oxide, pyrethroids–eg, permethrin, cypermethrin, etc–eg, 2,4-D, atrazine, paraquat. See Intermediate syndrome, Organophosphate pesticide.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd)
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

any agent that causes the death of a pest. The general definition is usually restricted to chemicals with pesticidal properties, such as herbicides, insecticides, acaricides and fungicides. Pesticide application can produce many problems, for example:
  1. (a) destruction of organisms useful to man (‘nontarget’ species).
  2. (b) directly harmful effects to man if used incorrectly
  3. (c) accumulation and concentration in food chains leading to toxicity in animals at a higher TROPHIC LEVEL.

pesticide

a poison used to destroy pests of any sort. See arsenical, carbamates, chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus compound, pyrethroids.

pesticide poisoning
pesticides are selective poisons chosen for use because of their relative safety for humans and animals. It is likely that they will poison these species if they are used in sufficient quantity or in special circumstances, for example when the water intake of the subject animals is limited.
pesticide resistance
continued use of a single agent, or a group of closely allied agents, can cause selective survival of insects with innate tolerance of the agent and lead to the development of a resistant population.
pesticide tissue residues
some pesticides have had to be withdrawn from use because of their persistence in the tissues of animals including humans. The passage of the agent in the milk of the animal is a comparable problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is no scientific evidence yet that says food laced with neonicotinoids will harm humans, but why is the EPA allowing systemic pesticides on food plants in the first place?
Systemic pesticides that enter the turfgrass plant by root absorption are effectively applied in granular form.
As with other chemical, systemic pesticides, the question of eventual pest resistance also applies to Admire.
In the United States, the beetle has struck in highly populated areas, so researchers are focusing most of their efforts on systemic pesticides they can inject into trees or apply to the soil, thus avoiding drift-prone aerial sprays.
Systemic pesticides will likely continue to be applied, at least in the near future, but perhaps one way for gardeners to facilitate change is to keep on asking these questions.
Daniel Ocampo, Greenpeace Philippines campaigner for sustainable agriculture and genetic engineering, cited a report by the Worldwide Integrated Assessment (WIA) of the Task Force on Systemic Pesticides of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which confirmed the harmful impact of pesticides, particularly neonicotinoids.
Bees have been dying due to systemic pesticides that are also harming human beings.
These systemic pesticides make all parts of a plant poisonous to insects--even the pollen and nectar, which are gathered and consumed by honeybees and other pollinators.
As Mother Earth News has reported, neonics are potent systemic pesticides that spread through plants and contaminate pollen and nectar.