pesticide

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pesticide

 [pes´tĭ-sīd]
a poison used to destroy pests of any sort.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd),
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

(pĕs′tĭ-sīd′)
n.
A substance or agent used to kill pests, such as unwanted or harmful insects, rodents, or weeds.

pes′ti·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

pesticide

Toxicology An annihilator of ambient arachnids, antagonistic arthropods, abominable animacules or pugnacious plants–eg, fumigants, fungicides, herbicides, insecticides; most are toxic and potentially fatal, with high arsenical or organophosphate content, and store in adipose tissue, given their lipid solubility Types Organochlorines-eg, DDT, chlordane, mirex, organophosphates–eg, parathion, diazinon, carbamates–eg, Aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran, metals–eg, copper, tributyl-tin oxide, pyrethroids–eg, permethrin, cypermethrin, etc–eg, 2,4-D, atrazine, paraquat. See Intermediate syndrome, Organophosphate pesticide.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd)
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

any agent that causes the death of a pest. The general definition is usually restricted to chemicals with pesticidal properties, such as herbicides, insecticides, acaricides and fungicides. Pesticide application can produce many problems, for example:
  1. (a) destruction of organisms useful to man (‘nontarget’ species).
  2. (b) directly harmful effects to man if used incorrectly
  3. (c) accumulation and concentration in food chains leading to toxicity in animals at a higher TROPHIC LEVEL.
References in periodicals archive ?
Systemic pesticides that enter the turfgrass plant by root absorption are effectively applied in granular form.
Systemic pesticides will likely continue to be applied, at least in the near future, but perhaps one way for gardeners to facilitate change is to keep on asking these questions.
The more people who ask, the more pressure companies will face to forgo systemic pesticides. And if a salesperson doesn't know the answer, ask to have the manager notified that you will no longer buy the business's products if they can't tell you what is in or on them.--Mother
The Bee the Change t-shirt is hand-screened on organic cotton so no bees were harmed in the process since most conventional cotton is treated with systemic pesticides. A portion of the money raised through t-shirt sales will benefit The Pollination Project (www.thepollinationproject.org), a non-profit organization that gives $1000 per day in grants to projects that change the world.
Neonicotinoids, or neonics, are a class of systemic pesticides that are also toxic to bees, killing them outright or affecting their ability to function.
These systemic pesticides make all parts of a plant poisonous to insects--even the pollen and nectar, which are gathered and consumed by honeybees and other pollinators.
As Mother Earth News has reported, neonics are potent systemic pesticides that spread through plants and contaminate pollen and nectar.
Named for their chemical structure, which is similar to that of nicotine, neonicotinoids are systemic pesticides, meaning they're in every part of a plant.
Remember the systemic neonicotinoid pesticides we told you about in our October/November 2010 issue ("Systemic Pesticides: Chemicals You Can't Wash Off") that are deadly to honeybees that consume pollen, nectar or even water droplets from treated plants?
Systemic pesticides are chemicals that are actually absorbed by a plant when applied to seeds, soil or leaves.
Department of Agriculture from 1999 to 2007, numerous samples contained residues of these systemic pesticides. For example, 74 percent of conventionally grown fresh lettuce and 70 percent of broccoli samples showed imidacloprid residues.