herbicide

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Related to Systemic herbicide: Systemic insecticide, Contact herbicide

herbicide

 [her´bĭ-sīd]
an agent that is destructive to weeds or causes an alteration in their normal growth.

herb·i·cide

(ĕr'bi-sīd)
Any chemical compound designed to kill plants. Herbicides have been used in military operations for deforestation, but the U.S. military excludes herbicides from being classified as chemical-warfare agents.

herbicide

any chemical that kills plants. Herbicides can be highly selective. For example, 2,4-D only kills DICOTYLEDONS (broad-leaved plants), leaving MONOCOTYLEDONS unharmed.
References in periodicals archive ?
For fall planted crops, it would be desirable to remove or chop the vegetation the previous spring and treat the field as fallow during the summer season by spraying the regrowth with a systemic herbicide. When a combination of cool and warm season grass species are involved, the systemic herbicide may need to be applied twice to avoid dormant periods.
It can be killed by spraying a systemic herbicide containing glyphosate on to both sides of the leaves, though it is important to ensure the chemical does not drift on to the foliage of other plants.
For tough perennial weeds such as dandelions, nettles and bindweed you need to kill the leaves and the roots, so a systemic herbicide containing glyphosate is the answer.
Recently, the Department of Environmental Horticulture at UC Davis tested three new controls--black tree paint, a growth regulator (ethephon), and the systemic herbicide glyphosate--and compared them to current recommended controls.
A post-harvest application of the systemic herbicide 2,4-D has proven effective in southeastern Pennsylvania for killing broad-leaf weeds in cover crops.
Spray hard-to-kill stoloniferous grasses while they're green and vigorously growing; use a systemic herbicide such as glyphosate.
For vine--row weed control, we use a systemic herbicide which, when consumed by plants, breaks down, combines with soil and leaves no residual damaging effect.
Plus, unlike horticultural vinegar, systemic herbicides are likely to destroy fungi that's beneficial to plants, such as those forming mycorrhizal networks that are connected to roots.
The National Arboretum says you should "use systemic herbicides carefully'' (President Barack Obama's air war), while also constantly working to strengthen and "preserve healthy native plant habitats'' (Obama's effort to forge a national unity government in Baghdad with Shiites, Sunnis and Kurds together).
* Systemic herbicides are translocated through the plant, either from foliar application down to the roots, or from soil application up to the leaves.

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