systematic name

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sys·te·mat·ic name

(sis'tĕ-mat'ik nām),
As applied to chemical substances, a systematic name is composed of specially coined or selected words or syllables, each of which has a precisely defined chemical structural meaning, so that the structure may be derived from the name. Water (trivial name) is hydrogen oxide (systematic). The systematic name of histamine (a semisystematic name) is imidazolethylamine, which indicates that a radical of imidazole replaces one hydrogen atom of ethylamine, which in turn is an ethyl group attached to an amine group. Dimethyl sulfoxide states that two methyl radicals are attached to a sulfur atom that holds an oxygen atom. Carbolic acid (trivial name) or phenol (semisystematic name) are, systematically, phenyl hydroxide or hydroxybenzene.
See also: semisystematic name.

sys·te·mat·ic name

(sistĕ-matik nām)
As applied to chemical substances, a combination of specially coined or selected words or syllables, each of which has a precisely defined chemical structural meaning, so that the structure may be derived from the name.

sys·te·mat·ic name

(sistĕ-matik nām)
As applied to chemical substances, composed of specially coined or selected words or syllables, each of which has a precisely defined chemical structural meaning, so that structure may be derived from the name. Water (trivial name) is hydrogen oxide (systematic).
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the most popular projects are the inauguration of a 7,000-square-meter public park in Char Habib on the edge of town, and the systematic naming of each street throughout the village.
Through the systematic naming and shaming of child rights violators by the Secretary-General, the world and the Security Council know who and where the perpetrators are and can take action, including sanctions, to bring such violations to an end.
They describe rhetoric/naming as social intervention, describe systematic naming and social intervention, and then expand the concept to criticism within the process and practice of intervention.
In that article, Dmitri described a systematic naming convention for the chemical elements with atomic numbers greater than 100.
Modern botanical taxonomy, the systematic naming of plants, arose out of necessity: Early-17th-century apothecaries needed to know whether the herbs going into their medicines were the real deal.

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