syrup

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syrup

 [sir´up]
a viscous concentrated solution of a sugar, such as sucrose, in water or other aqueous liquid; combined with other ingredients, such a solution is used as a flavored vehicle for medications. In common usage, the term is often expanded to include any oral dosage form (for example, an oral suspension) in a sweet and viscous vehicle.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

syr·up

(sir'ŭp),
1. Refined molasses; the uncrystallizable saccharine solution left after the refining of sugar.
2. Any sweet fluid; a solution of sugar in water in any proportion.
3. A liquid preparation of medicinal or flavoring substances in a concentrated aqueous solution of a sugar, usually sucrose; other polyols, such as glycerin or sorbitol, may be present to retard crystallization of sucrose or to increase the solubility of added ingredients. When the syrup contains a medicinal substance, it is termed a medicated syrup; although a syrup tends (due to its very high [approximately 85%] sucrose content) to resist mold or bacterial contamination, a syrup may contain antimicrobial agents to prevent bacterial and mold growth.
Synonym(s): sirup, syrupus
[Mod. L. syrupus, fr. Ar. sharāb]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

syrup

also

sirup

(sĭr′əp, sûr′-)
n.
A concentrated solution of sugar in water, often used as a vehicle for medicine.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

syrup

Herbal medicine
A solution of herbs in concentrated sugar, which preserves the concoction and attenuates potentially bitter tastes (e.g., onions or garlic). Honey is most commonly used, but others (such as brown sugar and glycerine) may also be used to produce syrups.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

syr·up

(syr.) (sir'ŭp)
1. Refined molasses; the uncrystallizable saccharine solution left after sugar is refined.
2. Any sweet fluid; a solution of sugar in water in any proportion.
3. A liquid preparation of medicinal or flavoring substances in a concentrated aqueous solution of a sugar, usually sucrose; when the syrup contains a medicinal substance, it is termed a medicated syrup.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

syr·up

(sir'ŭp)
1. Refined molasses.
2. Any sweet fluid; a solution of sugar in water in any proportion.
3. A liquid preparation of medicinal or flavoring substances in a concentrated aqueous solution of a sugar, usually sucrose; other polyols, such as glycerin or sorbitol, may be present to retard crystallization of sucrose or to increase the solubility of added ingredients.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about syrup

Q. Addiction to a cough syrup?? Is it true you can get addicted to cough syrup? And is so- why is that? Is it dangerous? Should I not take cough syrup?

A. here is a story about an air force pilot who had an addiction to cough suppressant who ended bad and about the phenomenon in general:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/4608341/

More discussions about syrup
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References in periodicals archive ?
These include our best-selling Ricemellow Creme[R], rice syrup-based fruit spreads, flavored rice syrups and traditional offerings such as organic molasses, organic agave syrup, organic honey, and organic barley malt syrup.
Akhtar also said that there was no need to remove it from the shelves till the last date of the syrups expiry.
Oral syrups segment is expected to expand at 2.9% CAGR over the estimated period and be valued more than US$ 10 Bn by the end of 2026.
Foodies, the health-conscious, kitchen enthusiasts and conventional consumers are all susceptible to maple syrup's charms
Two popular homegrown sweeteners are tree syrups and sorghum molasses.
Because if you're limiting maple syrup to the breakfast table, you're missing out on all sorts of excuses to add its gentle, yet distinct flavor to all manner of foods, from roasted vegetables and chicken wings to pasta sauce and ice cream sundaes.
The prepared date syrups were palatability tested in terms of color, taste, consistency, and acceptability compared with date syrup from local market as control.
Monin's bakery line is designed to deliver "fresh out of the oven" flavor: the banana nut bread syrup offers a combination of ripe banana flavor with a touch of nut and spice; the cinnamon bun syrup delivers the taste of cinnamon and brown sugar with icing on top; and the cupcake syrup satisfies a craving for an iced vanilla cupcake.
North American Indians made the first maple syrup and used it as both food and medicine, not realizing the exact health benefits the sweet product provided.
Not all syrups depend upon a living organism for their existence.
Sweet Freedom syrup, the first all-natural alternative to sugar made 100% from fruit (just apples, grapes and carob) is the main ingredient in Kirsty Henshaw's healthier iced dessert range.
Spurious cough syrups worth Rs five crore were seized from a house in a dingy Moradabad locality on Friday evening.