syndemic


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syndemic

(sin″dem′ik) [ syn- + analogy with (en)demic, (epi)demic]
A network of health problems, esp. ones that share common social underpinnings and cause an increased public health burden on a community. An example of a syndemic is the linkage between the ready availability of snack foods, low socioeconomic status, sedentary lifestyle, overeating, obesity, and an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Obesity, malnutrition and climate change (and the effects on the health of the people and on the natural systems upon which we depend) are now acknowledged as a global syndemic that affects the majority of people in all countries around the world (1).
"The Global Syndemic of Obesity, Undernutrition, and Climate Change: The Lancet Commission Report", en: Lancet, published online Jan 27, disponible en: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32822-8
HIV and tuberculosis: A deadly human syndemic. Clin Microbiol Rev 2011;24(2):351-376.
2019 is the year of nutrition for The Lancet family of journals, as it publishes reports from commissions on healthy diets from sustainable food systems (EAT); the"global syndemic of obesity, undernutrition, and climate change"; and a series of other papers.
"Joining three pandemics" -- hunger, obesity, climate -- "together as 'The Global Syndemic' allows us to consider common drivers and shared solutions."
These interrelated health problems and social issues are characterized as a syndemic (synergistic epidemic) of mutually reinforcing conditions or epidemics directed by biological, behavioral, psycho-social, and structural determinants.
The syndemic effects of intimate partner violence, HIV/AIDS, and substance abuse on depression among low-income urban women.
Tuberculosis and chronic kidney disease: an emerging global syndemic. Kidney Int 2016;90(1):34-40.
The co-occurrence of these epidemics is often referred to as substance abuse, violence, and HIV/AIDS (SAVA) syndemic. (1).
A recent review of HIV and trauma concludes that the prevalence of trauma is 1.5-2 times greater in people living with HIV than the general population and that both HIV infection and trauma constitute a syndemic, that is, two or more conditions that occur together, interact synergistically, and result in excess burden of disease [7].
[1] With reduced mortality, the HIV/tuberculosis (TB) syndemic has risen alongside NCDs associated with urbanisation.
[T]he urban subcultures to which men migrate are somewhat limited in their capacity to be supportive because MSM [men who have sex with men] bring their inherited masculinity norms, internalized homophobia, and histories of victimization--all aspects of the syndemic affecting MSM health--to this new, less-structured social realm.