symporter

(redirected from Symporters)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

sym·port·er

(sim-pōrt'ĕr),
The protein responsible for mediating symport.

symporter

(sim-port'er)
A membrane protein that carries two different ions or molecules in the same direction through the membrane, as in the absorption of glucose linked with that of sodium ions in the small intestine.
See: antiporter
References in periodicals archive ?
There occur three different types of transport proteins; first type is the uniport transport pass, a single type of molecule down its concentration gradient, while symporters are cotransport proteins which allow the movement of both types of ions in the same direction outside to inside.
lysine symporter channel, and sodium-lysine transporter Metal ions Fe, Cu, and Ag Membrane transporter proteins such as ABC transport proteins Free metal ion and Fe, Cu, Ag oxides, Transferrin carries metal complexes and sulphates species, such as the free metal ion and complexes of the metal with an amino acid or protein.
This molecule is called the sodium iodide symporter (abbreviated NIS; a symporter is a protein embedded in a cell's membrane that helps to move several different molecules or ions into the cell).
Image-guided radiovirotherapy for multiple myeloma using a recombinant measles virus expressing the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter.
Radioiodide imaging and radiovirotherapy of multiple myeloma using VSV(Delta51)-NIS, an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus encoding the sodium iodide symporter gene.
Oncolytic measles virus encoding thyroidal sodium iodide symporter for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck radiovirotherapy.
Noninvasive imaging and radiovirotherapy of prostate cancer using an oncolytic measles virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter.
This does not mean that the patient was developing hypothyroidism but that the brain was stimulating the body to make more sodium iodide symporters (NIS).
Hormonal regulation of radioiodide uptake activity and Na/I symporter expression in mammary glands.