symbiosis

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symbiosis

 [sim″bi-o´sis, sĭm″bē-ō´sĭs] (pl. symbio´ses)
1. in parasitology, the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species; it is classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between a mother and infant. adj., adj symbiot´ic.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis),
1. The biologic association of two or more species. Compare: commensalism, mutualistic symbiosis, parasitism.
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant, or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.
[G. symbiōsis, state of living together, fr. sym- + bios, life, + -osis, condition]

symbiosis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. symbio·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. The biologic association of two or more species to their mutual benefit.
Compare: commensalism, parasitism
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

A close association, of interdependence or mutual benefit, between two or more organisms, often of different species.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. Biologic association of two or more species.
2. Mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people.
References in periodicals archive ?
Symbiotics already has begun boring through the concrete abutment and expects to be done with that by the end of the month, Clemans said.
Symbiotics wants to avoid having to do that work in December or January, with their typically heavy rains, Clemans said.
Mowat and Symbiotics did not return calls seeking comment.
Current investments include Vestaron, a developer of proprietary, environmentally-conscious agriculture insecticide products based on polypeptides found in spider venom; and its most recent investment, NewLeaf Symbiotics, an agricultural biotech firm that is commercializing a family of beneficial bacteria shown to improve plant health, promote early growth, and increase crop yield.
Vince Lamarra, the Symbiotics CEO and board member of its parent company, Riverbank Power, did not respond to a telephone call seeking comment.
Erik Steimle, Symbiotics project manager in the firm's Portland office, did not immediately respond to phone and e-mail requests for comment on Wednesday.
Symbiotics aquatic biologist Kai Stimle said Tuesday that construction on the 58-year-old earth and gravel dam located on the Row River is at least a year off, maybe longer.
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission issued a preliminary permit to Symbiotics on the Dorena project in 2001.
Neither Symbiotics nor EPUD currently has a valid preliminary permit, much less a license, to build a hydro project at Fall Creek.
Vince LaMarra, a partner in Symbiotics, explained the company's plans to retrofit the 57-year-old dam, a gravel facility with a concrete arch spillway.
If Symbiotics proceeds with the complicated licensing process, its plans are likely to spark opposition from fisheries and environmental groups, as well as from property owners in the path of the transmission lines.
Many symbiotic stars brighten sharply from time to time.