symbiosis

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symbiosis

 [sim″bi-o´sis, sĭm″bē-ō´sĭs] (pl. symbio´ses)
1. in parasitology, the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species; it is classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between a mother and infant. adj., adj symbiot´ic.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis),
1. The biologic association of two or more species. Compare: commensalism, mutualistic symbiosis, parasitism.
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant, or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.
[G. symbiōsis, state of living together, fr. sym- + bios, life, + -osis, condition]

symbiosis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. symbio·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. The biologic association of two or more species to their mutual benefit.
Compare: commensalism, parasitism
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

A close association, of interdependence or mutual benefit, between two or more organisms, often of different species.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. Biologic association of two or more species.
2. Mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people.
References in periodicals archive ?
Technologically advanced and morally unscrupulous, the Life Foundation have gotten their hands on an alien symbiote and are using it to do illegal experiments on humans, in a bid to try and increase life and its potential.
Then the visual effects boys are building an entire symbiote. Because the eyeballs and teeth ratio is so different on Venom to a human, it is not possible to do facial recognition off a mo-cap suit.
Soon afterwards, Eddie has a close encounter with one of the symbiotes and a creature called Venom melds with the reporter's body.
The cosmic battle between the two severed Knull's connection with his symbiote army and without the hive mind ruling them, the symbiotes were free to take on new hosts.
Web of Venom: Ve'Nam unravels the backstory of Rex Strickland, the Vietnam vet who survived a symbiote attack on an American and a Viet Cong platoon.
Phylognetic position of the yeast-like symbiotes of tagosodes orizicolus (Homoptera: Delphacidae) based on 18S ribosomal DNA partial sequences.
Morphological and molecular studies on intracellular bacterial symbiotes of insects.
This latest offering develops the revelation that Peter Parker and Eddie Brock were not the first humans to encounter symbiotes. Web of Venom: Ve'Nam unravels the backstory of Rex Strickland, the Vietnam vet who survived a symbiote attack on an American and a Viet Cong platoon.
The key from which much here follows is thinking of forests not as a collection of trees engaged in all-out competition for sunlight and water, but as a mutually supportive network, exchanging information and even nutrients via subterranean networks of fungal symbiotes (inevitably described as "the forest internet" - the chummy anthropomorphism can grow wearying, as too the corny jokes, which in fairness may have been less groanworthy in the original German).
Arthropods such as fleas, lice and mites are to be considered the most frequently investigated avian symbiotes (Figuerola, 2000; Rendell and Verbeek, 1996).
Phylogenetic position of yeast-like symbiotes of rice planthoppers based on partial 18S rDNA sequences.
Abstract: Tagosodes orizicolus Muir (Homoptera: Delphacidae), the endemic delphacid species of tropical America carries yeast-like symbiotes (YLS) in the abdominal fat bodies and the ovarial tissues, like other rice planthoppers of Asia.