syllabus

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syllabus

(sĭl′ă-bŭs) [Gr. syllabos, table of contents]
An abstract of a lecture or outline of a course of study or of a book.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But the point of this little digression is to suggest that Southern Baptists in recent years have issued their own Syllabus of Errors, have summoned their own Vatican Council I.
The Vatican condemnations of a Syllabus of Errors in 1864, of Americanism in 1899, and of Modernism in 1907 make for grim reading in the twenty-first century.
Also, Pope Pius IX tried to stem the tide of modernism sweeping across Europe by issuing the Syllabus of Errors in 1865.
The stress on universal, traditional values, however, does not mean that the pope wishes to return the church to its preconciliar rejection of all elements of modernity, as did Pius IX in the Syllabus of Errors (1864).
Gaudi studied architecture when, according to Van Hensbergen, Catholic art was "mired in a swamp of saccharine sentimentality." The official Catholic style was "full-blown kitsch," and could be traced back to Pope Pius IX's 1864 Syllabus of Errors, which claimed modernity as responsible for society's decadence.
The longest-serving pope in history, Pius IX (1846-78), presided over the First Vatican Council (papal infallibility), published the Syllabus of Errors (condemning major developments of the modern world), and lost the Papal States in a conflict with the newly formed Kingdom of Italy.
are really to be found among liberalism's most determined adversaries," and that thinkers such as Frederic Le Play and Rene de La Tour du Pin not only embraced the Syllabus of Errors and its condemnation of a godless society but were also convinced that the improvement of the worker's lot could not be effected without the participation of the ruling class.
In 1864 he issued a "Syllabus of Errors" purporting to list various theological errors denounced by the church.
Gregory XVI's repudiation of Lamennais's liberal Catholicism; Pius IX's brief flirtation with liberalism, followed by nearly 30 years of intransigence (obstinate defense of the Papal States; the Syllabus of Errors; the repudiation of the Law of Guarantees of 1866, which anticipated the eventual solution of the Lateran Treaty; the non expedit).
Bartholomew's Day Massacre (1572) and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685), while Catholics linked Protestantism after 1789 with the "revolutionary spirit." After the papal pronouncement on the dogma of the Immaculate Conception and the publication of the Syllabus of Errors (1864), further retrenchment occurred on both sides.
He rightly sees the papal war on liberalism and nationalism provoked by the Risorgimento, and the Syllabus of Errors, and even the declaration of Papal Infallibility, inspired by the papal reaction or counter-Risorgimento.