beet

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beet

see betavulgaris.

beet pulp
the residue of the roots when the juice is extracted. Highly regarded as a feed supplement for extra energy in high producing cows. Called also beets.
beet tops
the foliage of the beet plant, used as green feed but has a high oxalate content.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study also determines the degree of uptake of essential and trace elements by Swiss chard vegetable irrigated with various concentrations of landfill leachate.
We recommend: Swiss Chard Ravioli and Grilled tiger prawns
Swiss chard can be found in the produce aisle all year, but is best June through August.
Pour the cooked malva and Swiss chard in a blender and blend until smooth.
While green vegetables like Swiss chard, kale and Brussels sprouts have their share of newer devotees, broccoli has been a superfood favorite for some years now.
One 4-pound halibut head, viscera and fins removed 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus as needed for basting Swiss chard greens, from above 1 clove garlic, peeled, impaled on fork tines 3/4 ounce butter Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Meanwhile, place the swiss chard in a colander in the sink and pour a kettle of just-boiled water over to wilt it.
The A-B Tech hot food team menu consisted of a classic fish dish, Paupiettes de sole a la Trouvillaise, a salad of mixed greens with pine nut encrusted Brie, an entree of roast pork tenderloin with potatoes and Swiss chard with apple brandy demi-glace, and a dessert of hazelnut cream in a chocolate shell with raspberry sauce.
The fried lobster comes forth slightly crispy and surprisingly endearing, really a comfort dish, gratifyingly sauced in a thyme-flavored beurre blanc with good creamy mashers and silky Swiss chard.
Bright Lights is a new generation of Swiss chard, a beet green with delicately flavored, brightly colored leaves of gold, orange, pink, red and white; Salad Savoy is a member of the cabbage family.
Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, collards, turnips, spinach, lettuce, and swiss chard can all be harvested through mild frosts, and some can grow straight through the hard freezes of late fall and early winter.

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