swim bladder

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air blad·der

a gas-filled sac that is present in most fish and functions as a hydrostatic organ; it is located beneath the vertebral column primarily in the anterior abdomen and is connected with the esophagus in some species (for example, goldfish). Oxygen is transferred from a rich venous sinus into the swim bladder to increase buoyancy.
Synonym(s): swim bladder

swim bladder

n.
A gas-filled structure in many fishes that functions to maintain buoyancy and, in some species, to aid in respiration or to produce sound. Also called air bladder, gas bladder.

swim bladder

see AIR BLADDER.
References in periodicals archive ?
Antibody against pulmonary surfactant protein a recognize proteins in intestine and swim bladder of the freshwater fish, carp.
Meanwhile, the Centre for Bio-energy and Brewing Science at the University of Nottingham is exploring whether ||YUM YUM: Fish swim bladders can be used to make beer used hops could serve the same purpose.
A non significant difference was noticed in the tensile strength of fresh and acellular swim bladders which indicated that triton X-100 and SDS has no effect on physical properties, but they would only extract cellular components following decellularization process.
The team was also able to discern that herring swim bladders resonated at a specific frequency--3 kHz--giving them the ability to detect specific species.
Scientists aren't sure digestive systems in fish can pass gas (the swim bladder is separate from a fish's gastrointestinal tract).
The finings are still made from traditional fish swim bladders which have an electrostatic effect, hoovering up any residual matter in the beer and forming sediment on the base of the keg.
Entwined together the sharks can no longer swim, and since sharks have no swim bladders and must either swim or sink, the sharks sink headfirst and at very rapid speed, falling towards Bob.
This is invariably done by adding isinglass which is derived from the swim bladders of fish.
Then they "croon" to females by contracting muscles around their air-filled swim bladders.
Although crappies appear to swim away, their swim bladders can't easily adjust to rapid vertical changes in pressure, and some float back to the surface, where they may die.
Part of the reason vaquitas are in such trouble is the prized - and also endangered - totoaba, a fish that shares the northern waters of the Gulf of California and is sought after for its swim bladders, desired in traditional Chinese medicine.
Due to the similarities and complexities of morphological characters, elaborated shape of the swim bladders is essential to identify the species (McKay, 1992).