suspension

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suspension

 [sus-pen´shun]
1. temporary cessation, as of pain or a vital process.
2. a supporting from above, as in treatment where extremities are elevated with a traction device.
3. a preparation of a finely divided, undissolved substance dispersed in a liquid vehicle.
bladder neck suspension any of various methods of surgical fixation of the urethrovesical junction area and the bladder neck to restore the neck to a high retropubic position for relief of stress incontinence. Among numerous types of procedures are the Burch procedure and the Pereyra procedure. Called also colposuspension.
colloid suspension a colloid system; see colloid (def. 2). Sometimes used specifically for a sol in which the dispersed phase is solid and the particles are large enough to settle out of solution.

sus·pen·sion

(sŭs-pen'shŭn),
1. A temporary interruption of any function.
2. A hanging from a support, as used in the treatment of spinal curvatures or during the application of a plaster jacket.
3. Fixation of an organ, such as the uterus, to other tissue for support.
4. The dispersion through a liquid of a solid in finely divided particles of a size large enough to be detected by purely optic means; if the particles are too small to be seen by microscope but still large enough to scatter light (Tyndall phenomenon), they will remain dispersed indefinitely and are then called a colloidal suspension Synonym(s): coarse dispersion
5. A class of pharmacopoeial preparations of finely divided, undissolved drugs (for example, powders for suspension) dispersed in liquid vehicles for oral or parenteral use.
[L. suspensio, fr. sus-pendo, pp. -pensus, to hang up, suspend]

suspension

The temporary removal of a doctor from the GMC register (UK) or from continuing in active practice in a particular post, which may be for disciplinary reasons.

suspension

1. The termination of an activity. See Pregnancy suspension, Summary suspension.
2. A fluid solute in a solvent. See Gadolite® oral suspension, Jones suspension.

sus·pen·sion

(susp.) (sŭs-pen'shŭn)
1. Temporary interruption of any function.
2. A hanging from a support, as used in the treatment of spinal curvatures or during the application of a plaster jacket.
3. Fixation of an organ, such as the uterus, to other tissue for support.
4. The dispersion through a liquid of a solid in finely divided particles of a size large enough to be detected by purely optic means; if the particles are too small to be seen by microscope but still large enough to scatter light (Tyndall phenomenon), they will remain dispersed indefinitely and it is then called a colloidal suspension
5. A class of pharmacopeial preparations of finely divided, undissolved drugs (e.g., powders for suspension) dispersed in liquid vehicles for oral or parenteral use.
[L. suspensio, fr. sus-pendo, pp. -pensus, to hang up, suspend]

suspension

a system in which denser, microscopically visible, particles are distributed throughout a less dense liquid and maintained there, settlement being hindered or prevented either by the viscosity of the fluid or the molecular impacts of the liquid's molecules on the particles.

suppression 

The process by which the brain inhibits the retinal image (or part of it) of one eye, when both eyes are simultaneously stimulated. This occurs to avoid diplopia as in strabismus, in uncorrected anisometropia, in retinal rivalry, etc. Syn. suspenopsia (this term actually refers to voluntary suppression as occurs, for example, when using a monocular microscope with one eye); suspension (most often used when referring to partial suppression). See cheiroscope; physiological diplopia; Javal's grid; Mallett fixation disparity unit; Remy separator; retinal rivalry; Bagolini lens test; four prism dioptre base out test; FRIEND test; Turville infinity balance test; Worth's four dot test; vectogram.

sus·pen·sion

(sŭs-pen'shŭn)
1. Temporary interruption of any function.
2. A hanging from a support, as used to treat spinal curvatures.
3. Fixation of an organ to other tissue for support.
4. Dispersion through a liquid of a solid in finely divided particles of a size large enough to be detected by purely optic means.
5. Class of pharmacopoeial preparations of finely divided, undissolved drugs dispersed in liquid vehicles for oral or parenteral use.
[L. suspensio, fr. sus-pendo, pp. -pensus, to hang up, suspend]
References in periodicals archive ?
GWYNEDD Spent: PS1,327,117 Longest suspension: 1,460 days Gwynedd council said:"There are circumstances when staff who are subject to a police investigation will need to be suspended from their post.
According to the documents, there were only three newly-appointed SHOs out of the total 84 who were having 'clean' service record with no suspension and dismissal.
For the problem, a vertical dynamic coupling vibration model of HSST type low-speed maglev train is established with five suspension frames.
Jasper ISD in East Texas had just 122 students in pre-K, but issued 71 in-school suspensions to 23 students in the 2015-2016 school year.
In this study, the partial state variable feedback technique is applied to develop an improved LQG controller for active suspension systems, in which the road input signals are ignored, whereby making it possible for extending the application area of LQG controller.
At least 56 representatives crossed party lines in a bid to clip the court's power and allow only the suspension of incumbent officials facing cases related to their current office.
where we denote [M.sub.sf] = (b/(a + b))[M.sub.g] and [M.sub.sr] = (a/(a + b))[M.sub.g], which just represent the sprung masses of front and rear quarter-car suspensions in the half-car, respectively.
"We would encourage all of us to maybe do a little bit better job in terms of letting Bar members and letting the public know what a 91-day or over 90-day suspension means."
The suspensions can be configured to fit nearly any heavy-duty OEM model.
There have been some researches on the use of air spring for suspension systems.
Backstepping control of a vehicle with active suspensions, Journal of Control Engineering Practice 16(12): 1457-1467.