filter feeder

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Related to Suspension feeder: filter feeder, Deposit feeder

filter feeder

any MICROPHAGOUS marine or freshwater animal that creates currents, usually by ciliary action, so that food particles are carried either into the body cavity, as is the case in, for example, the sea-squirt, or across the gills where the particles are trapped in MUCUS which is carried, again by ciliary action, into the entrance to the gut system. The freshwater clam, Anodonta, is an example of the latter type of filter feeder.
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Dr Jakob Vinther, a lecturer in macroevolution at the University of Bristol, said: "The fact that large, free-swimming suspension feeders roamed the oceans tells us a lot about the ecosystem."
But, unlike most gastropods, they are primarily suspension feeders (Orton 1912, Declerck 1995, Collin 2001, Shumway et al.
Active suspension feeders must pump water across their filtering structures to feed, which incurs a metabolic cost (Jorgensen, 1966; Wildish and Kristmanson, 1997).
Effects of flow speed on growth of benthic suspension feeders. Biol.
The importance of boundary-layer flows in supplying phytoplankton to the benthic suspension feeder, Mytilus edulis L.
Thus suspension feeding preceded the limpet-shaped shell, the latter evolving as an adaptation for resistance to dislodgement in the sedentary suspension feeder (Yonge, 1962).
senile, that are dependent on direct gas exchange through their tissues (Patterson and Sebens, 1989; Patterson et at., 1991; Lesser et al., 1994), and certainly influence the rates of food capture by Metridium senile, a passive suspension feeder. Our results do not show any evidence of flow-modulated respiration rates in M.
Clearance rate has been posited as being physiologically plastic, with suspension feeders being able to adjust this rate as a response to environmental factors (Bayne & Newell 1983, Cranford & Grant 1990, Bacon et al.
Benthic suspension feeders are recognized as being important components of shallow marine ecosystems, where they are capable of moving large quantities of particles from the water column to the benthos (Ribes et al., 2005; Pile and Young, 2006).
Suspension feeders are also negatively affected due to their higher sensitivity to the decomposition products of oil together with the effect of clogging of their filtration system by oil particles (Tedengren & Kautsky, 1987; Berge, 1990; Kiorboe & Mohlenberg, 1981).
KEY WORDS: benthic-pelagic coupling, bivalves, denitrification, eutrophication, extractive aquaculture, nutrient cycling, nutrient enrichment, nutrient trading, suspension feeders

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