Susac syndrome

Susac syndrome

(soo'sak?)
[John O. Susac, U.S. neurologist, 1941–2012]
A rare vascular disease characterized by acute encephalopathy, branched retinal artery occlusion, and sensorineural hearing loss. It typically afflicts teenage girls.
Synonym: retinocochleocerebral vasculopathy
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Susac syndrome, pregnancy, encephalopathy
Susac syndrome, usually seen in young females, is an angiopathy of unknown etiology that presents with various signs including ataxia, vertigo, pyramidal signs, and epileptic seizures due to extensive white and gray matter involvement.
Susac syndrome is less prevalent among pregnant women because immune-mediated clinical conditions are less common during pregnancy.
Wildemann et al., "Characteristics of Susac syndrome: a review of all reported cases," Nature Reviews Neurology, vol.
Cervera, "Diagnosis and classification of Susac syndrome," Autoimmunity Reviews, vol.
The topic of the final case report is Susac syndrome, a fairly rare disorder characterized by the triad of encephalopathy, sensorineural hearing loss, and branch retinal artery occlusion.
Jess Lydon is trapped in the present after doctors diagnosed her with Susac syndrome - dubbed "Groundhog Day" after the hit movie in which Bill Murray relives the same day.
The 19-year-old has been diagnosed with a baffling condition called Susac syndrome.
Susac syndrome is an extremely rare condition that mainly affects women aged between 20 and 40.
He said: "Susac syndrome is a very rare condition that most neuroscience centres would see no more than one case every few years.
Susac syndrome is a rare occlusive vasculopathy affecting the retina, inner ear and brain.
Keywords: Optical coherence tomography, retina, retinal artery occlusion, Susac syndrome, diagnosis