Surviving Sepsis Campaign


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Surviving Sepsis Campaign

An international effort to reduce mortality from sepsis. It is a joint undertaking of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the International Sepsis Forum, and the Society of Critical Care Medicine.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign International guidelines and EU and US regulatory bodies (7-9), the Turkish regulatory bodies and associations (10) discourage the use of HES in patients with sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock and critical illness; intensive care patients and patients undergoing open heart surgery or cardiopulmonary bypass due to the risk of bleeding, as well as in patients with acute severe liver failure or those with a history of renal dysfunction (see Table 1 for a summary of recommendations on colloids in Turkey).
(SSC = Surviving Sepsis Campaign; Pa[O.sub.2] = partial pressure of arterial oxygen; Fi[O.sub.2] = fractional inspired oxygen; INR = international normalised ratio; aPTT = activated partial thromboplastin time.) I.
The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: Results of an international guideline-based performance improvement program targeting severe sepsis.
TABLE 1: Surviving Sepsis Campaign Coordinators of this campaign identified four steps to be completed within three hours of presentation.
The Surviving Sepsis Campaign focuses on compliance with sepsis bundle and its association with mortality.
While the use of low dose GC was initially incorporated into the 2004 Surviving Sepsis campaign guidelines, the latest guidelines (2012) suggest not to use GC to treat adult septic shock patients, unless adequate fluid resuscitation and vasopressor therapy are unable to restore hemodynamic stability (grade 2C evidence) [1].
* A study of African countries reported less than 1.5% of healthcare providers had the resources necessary to implement the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines
Once sepsis is suspected, prompt therapy needs to be started as per the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines.
Internationally, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign promotes screening of "every patient, every shift, every day" for sepsis, while new United Kingdom guidelines recommend health practitioners ask, "Could this be sepsis?" for any patient with signs of a possible infection.
This can be attributed to the population increase associated and with better diagnosis of these conditions, as during the studied period educational campaign efforts were made regarding the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC).