surveillance

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surveillance

 [sur-vāl´ans]
1. watching or monitoring.
2. a procedure used instead of quarantine to control the spread of infectious disease, involving close supervision during the incubation period of possible contacts of individuals exposed to an infectious disease.
3. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making.
surveillance: community in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of data for decision-making in the community.
surveillance: late pregnancy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of maternal-fetal data for treatment, observation, or admission. See also pregnancy.
surveillance and/or observation a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; action through which the nurse examines and monitors physical and behavioral responses to disease or injury and to the prescribed medical and/or nursing therapy.
surveillance: remote electronic in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition of patient data via electronic modalities (telephone, video conferencing, e-mail) from distant locations as well as interpretation and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making with individuals or populations. See also telehealth.
surveillance: safety in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing collection and analysis of information about the patient and the environment for use in promoting and maintaining patient safety.
skin surveillance in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the collection and analysis of patient data to maintain skin and mucous membrane integrity. See also skin care.
surveillance (omaha) in the omaha system, an intervention on the first level of the intervention scheme, defined as nursing activities of detection, measurement, critical analysis, and monitoring to indicate client status in relation to a given condition or phenomenon.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lănts),
1. The collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data; a type of observational study that involves continuous monitoring of disease occurrence within a population.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability, uniformity, or rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

surveillance

(1) The ongoing observation of the health of individuals or populations.
(2) The monitoring of diseases that have a known prevalence in a population.
(3) The ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health data.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

surveillance

Epidemiology
1. The monitoring of diseases that have a certain prevalence in a population.
2. The ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health data. See Epidemiologic surveillance, Fluoride surveillance, Health surveillance, HIV surveillance, Immunosurveillance, Medical surveillance, Public health surveillance, Sentinel surveillance, Site-specific surveillance.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lăns)
1. The collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data; a type of observational study that involves continuous monitoring of disease occurrence within a population.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability, uniformity, and rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lăns)
1. Collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability and rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In theory, using or accessing surveillance technology lowers an individual's privacy interests.
John Deng, Vimicro's chairman and CEO, said, 'We are pleased to form this strategic alliance with the State Grid Hunan Electric Power Corporation, which is a testament of the adoption of the SVAC national video surveillance technology standard by China's electric power industry.
"It's allowed firms such as ours who deal with cutting-edge surveillance technology and video analytics to gain a good loyal customer base in Macau," Graham said.
For the United States, the author opines that the probable abuser of the public trust thinks misuse of surveillance technology is not the federal government but rather state governments and private contractors.
Strasbourg: The Council of Europe has proposed introducing export controls of surveillance technology to protect citizens from abusive online snooping after a whistleblower revealed a US spy programme that sparked a fierce debate on privacy.
After an overview, they focus on forms of surveillance technology and strategy: video-surveillance, border searches of electronic devices, wiretapping and other legally questionable backdoors, GPS monitoring and location tracking, and a final section on privacy on the internet.
The award specifically mentions Motorola's city surveillance technology in and around the city of Chicago.
From its base in Norway, Indra Navia supplies communication, navigation, and surveillance technology to airports and air traffic control organizations.
When it comes to digital surveillance technology, grocers today have more options than ever before.

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