surrogate mother

(redirected from Surrogate mothers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Surrogate mothers: Gestational surrogacy

sur·ro·gate moth·er

a woman who has been contracted with to carry a pregnancy for another woman or couple.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

surrogate mother

n.
1. A woman who agrees, often for pay, to give birth to a child resulting from artificial insemination or the implantation of an already fertilized egg and who surrenders any parental rights to a third party.
2. One that acts as, serves as, or is a mother substitute.

surrogate motherhood n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

surrogate mother

Contract mother, surrogacy Social medicine A ♀ who agrees to be (artificially) inseminated with the sperm of the partner of an infertile ♀; the SM carries the baby to term, at which point it is adopted by the biological father and his partner. See Gestational surrogacy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sur·ro·gate moth·er

(sŭr'ŏ-găt mŏdh'ĕr)
A woman who is under contract to carry a pregnancy for another woman or couple.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A surrogate mother can earn anywhere between 400,000 and 1.2 million rupees (US$5,628-16,885) per birth, depending on the clinic she attends and its location, while the industry as a whole is worth billions of US dollars.
Despite the apparently standard nature of the surrogacy application, it was dismissed for three reasons, each being sufficient: (i) concern about surrogacy as a means of income; (ii) concern about the intended surrogate mother's psychological wellbeing; and (iii) concern about the impartiality of healthcare professionals.
The surrogate mother is at a higher risk for postpartum complications: hemorrhaging and exhaustion.
T he proposed law is silent on crucial aspects like: 1) rights of the child if the adoptive-parents reject it mid-way or after birth; 2) rights of the surrogate mother if she faces health issues during and after pregnancy; 3) Rights of the family of surrogate mother if she loses life in the process of child birth; 4) Mandatory time period (spacing out) between previous pregnancy and the current one for the surrogate mother; 5) Couples who marry late in life (after 40s); 6) single women who do not want to marry but want to be mother nevertheless.
Russian legislation does not establish any penalties for improper performance and contract breach by a surrogate mother.
The cabinet defended its decision by saying that this would help promote medical tourism and it seems to be doing just that as foreigners seeking surrogate mothers are trickling into Nepal, particularly in the Terai region, which lies on the Indian/Nepalese border.
This is further complicated by the lack of strong legal provisions to safeguard the interest of the surrogate mother.
Her eggs were reportedly embedded in women who had agreed to be surrogate mothers.
Commercial surrogacy is not illegal in Thailand, which has made the country a sought after destination for foreigners looking for surrogate mothers, according to BBC.
These guidelines for foreigners planning surrogacy in India came up in July 2012 following allegations that commissioning parents from abroad were cheating the surrogate mothers. There are also few reported cases that the children were ill-treated in foreign land and that they are not treated as citizens there.
It deals with aspects such as the criteria that prospective commissioning parents and prospective surrogate mothers must fulfil, confirmation of the surrogacy agreement by the Court, and the enforceability of such an agreement.
In 2011 three US surrogacy-industry professionals were convicted of wire fraud, exposed for running a global trafficking ring for "designer babies" with blond hair and blue eyes, obtaining genetic material from undisclosed Ukrainian citizens, recruiting impoverished US American women to serve as surrogate mothers, and charging up to $180,000 to intended parents.