supraclavicular lymph nodes

(redirected from Supraclavicular lymph node)

su·pra·cla·vic·u·lar lymph nodes

[TA]
the portion of the inferior deep lateral cervical nodes located between the inferior belly of the omohyoid muscle and the clavicle; afferent vessels come from adjacent regions including the mediastinum; efferent vessels terminate in the subclavian trunk.

su·pra·cla·vic·u·lar lymph nodes

(sūpră-klă-vikyū-lăr limf nōdz) [TA]
Deep cervical lymph nodes that are found along the length of the clavicle.
See also: lymph node

supraclavicular lymph nodes (soo´prəklavik´ūlur),

n the deep cervical nodes located along the clavicle.
References in periodicals archive ?
A biopsy of a left supraclavicular lymph node identified a metastatic papillary adenocarcinoma without atypia; some rare follicular structures were filled with eosinophilic material that mimicked a colloid (figure 2).
He presented in August 2010 with a palpable left supraclavicular lymph node and underwent a radical left cervical lymph node dissection, showing one positive node out of 28.
Supraclavicular lymph node irradiation is indicated when 4 or more axillary nodes are invaded, usually suggesting a 15-20% risk of supraclavicular lymph node involvement.
1) Hodgkin disease characteristically presents as asymptomatic supraclavicular lymph node enlargement in a young adult, but may also be discovered in the mid or high neck or in the axilla.
His physical exam was remarkable only for a 4-cm nontender left supraclavicular lymph node.
Cervical non-supraclavicular lymph node involvement was seen in 3 patients, and supraclavicular lymph nodes in 4; pulmonary metastases occurred in 7, and liver metastases in 1 patient.
Because a complete restaging did not uncover a different primary tumor or a further metastasis, the diagnosis of nonseminomatous carcinoma primary to the supraclavicular lymph node was established.
Superior vena cava syndrome caused by supraclavicular lymph node metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.
Physical examination was remarkable for an enlarged right supraclavicular lymph node and splenomegaly.
Patients with respiratory compromise and small axillary or supraclavicular lymph nodes should be aspirated with care (if at all), as a pneumothorax could prove fatal in these patients.
The most common locations for extrathoracic metastases include supraclavicular lymph nodes, adrenal glands, liver, bone, and brain (12) (Figures 8, 9, and 10).

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