XYY syndrome

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XYY syn·drome

a chromosomal anomaly with chromosome count 47, with a supernumerary Y chromosome; may be associated with tallness, increased physical activity, and a tendency to learning problems.

XYY syn·drome

a chromosomal anomaly with chromosome count 47, with a supernumerary Y chromosome; may be associated with tallness, increased physical activity, and a tendency to learning problems.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Klinefelter syndrome

A syndrome with a 47, XXY chromosome complement, in which the subjects are phenotypically male but have seminiferous tubule dysgenesis, elevated plasma and urinary gonadotropins, variable gynecomastia, eunuchoid habitus and possibly female secondary sex characteristics. Some patients are chromosomal mosaics, with two or more cell lines of different chromosome constitution.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

XYY syndrome

YY syndrome A condition characterized by an extra Y chromosome, an array of typical clinical features–facial asymmetry, long ears, teeth and fingers, poor musculoskeletal development, cranial synostosis, prolonged P-R on EKG, and a possible tendency toward antisocial behavior
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

XYY syn·drome

(sin'drōm)
Aneuploidy with a supernumerary Y chromosome; associated with increased stature, aggressiveness, hyperactive behavior, mental retardation, and acne.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Four micrograms of genomic DNA samples from males, pseudomales, and supermales were digested with HindIII restriction enzyme, subsequently electrophoresed in 0.8% agarose gels and transferred onto a nylon membrane (Hybond-[N.sup.+], Amersham).
A total of 298 primer combinations from 24 arbitrary 10-mer oligonucleotides were tested using DNA pools from eight [X.sup.e][X.sup.e] pseudomales, seven [X.sup.e][Y.sup.f] males (five F1 [X.sup.e][Y.sup.f] male and two F4 [X.sup.e][Y.sup.f] males after three successive generations of [X.sup.e][X.sup.e] female mating to [X.sup.e][Y.sup.f] male), and two [Y.sup.f][Y.sup.f] supermales, respectively, as shown in Figure 2(a).
This can be achieved via several approaches such as interspecific hybridization [54], hormone treatment [55], and YY supermales [15].
Beyond the proliferation of scientific and scholarly treatises on all aspects of fatigue lurked a projection, the daydream of the late nineteenth century, the fantasy of a body without fatigue." (9) This fantasy serves as Jarry's point of departure into the physiological adventures he describes in The Supermale, ordeals of pleasure and pain that are in the last analysis a meditation on the phenomenon of energy itself.
Although he was seen riding in an automobile as early as 19o4, the motorized vehicle never inspired him in the way that human propulsion did, since it demanded too little of the human organism whose capacities are both honored and satirized by his account in The Supermale of a 10,000-mile race between a five-man cycling team and an express train pulled by a locomotive.
The Supermale appeared at a time when analogies between the human organism and machines filled the air.
The spectacle of pain that erupts at the end of The Supermale recalls a French predecessor who became famous for his own version of the clinical gaze--the Marquis de Sade.
Publication of The Supermale coincided with a report in a French physiology journal that scientists had used telephones to listen in on the human nervous system.
The supermale and superfemale faces were created by distorting (warping) the grey-level map of each average into a new configuration that exaggerated how that image differed from the opposite-sex average (see Rhodes, Byatt, Tremewan, & Kennedy, 1997, for details).
Each participant was shown a pair of images containing the average male and the supermale, and a pair containing the average female and the superfemale.
The proportion of participants choosing the supermale or superfemale face as more attractive was calculated separately for male and female faces and participants (see Table 1).
In Expt 1 the average male was preferred to the supermale, but Perrett et al.'s (1998) findings suggest that a feminized male may be even more attractive than an average male image.