superficial vein

(redirected from Superficial veins)

su·per·fi·cial vein

[TA]
one of a number of veins that course in the subcutaneous tissue and empty into deep veins; they form prominent systems of vessels in the limbs and are usually not accompanied by arteries.

superficial vein

one of the many veins between the subcutaneous fascia just under the skin. Compare deep vein.

su·per·fi·cial vein

(sū'pĕr-fish'ăl vān) [TA]
One of several veins that course in the subcutaneous tissue and empty into deep veins; they form prominent systems of vessels in the limbs and are usually not accompanied by arteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Food and Drug Administration today approved the VenaSeal closure system (VenaSeal system) to permanently treat varicose veins of the legs by sealing the affected superficial veins using an adhesive agent.
Specifically, the indictment alleges that the company maintained a deceptive sales campaign for its Vari-Lase product line, which had received FDA approval for the treatment of superficial veins.
If the valves in the deep veins don't close adequately, the blood flows back into superficial veins near the skin.
These veins are also prone to the development of superficial thrombophlebitis, as well as occasional bleeding from superficial veins and thinning of the overlying skin.
In our series, prominence in the superficial veins and learning difficulty were found in two patients, decreased HDL was found in patient 5, triangular face and mitral valve failure were found in patient 6, but urogenital anomaly was not found in any patient.
Superficial veins (the greater and shorter saphenous veins and their branches) lie outside this supportive fascia and communicate with the deep veins via perforator veins.
Valves in the vein close like gates if blood tries to run in the wrong direction, but if these valves fail to work properly, blood is forced to flow back down the leg causing superficial veins under the skin to bulge.
There are two sets of veins in the legs, the superficial veins that lie under the skin and the deep veins that lie in the muscle itself.
Patients often present with pain and swelling after strenuous activity, a cyanotic arm, dilated superficial veins, and tenderness to palpation over the deltopectoral groove.
These new methods of resolving venous hypertension in the superficial veins of the lower extremities are safe and offer better patient outcomes with significantly less patient inconvenience than prior surgical remedies.

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