collective unconscious

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unconscious

 [un-kon´shus]
1. insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli and of having subjective experiences.
2. the part of the mind that is not readily accessible to conscious awareness by ordinary means but whose existence may be manifested in symptom formation, in dreams, or under the influence of drugs; it is one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.
collective unconscious in jungian psychology, the portion of the unconscious that is theoretically common to mankind.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

col·lec·tive un·con·scious

in jungian psychology, the combined memory potentials inherited from a person's phylogenetic past, the deeper layer of the unconscious, wherein reside archetypes. See: archetype (2).
See also: personal unconscious.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

collective unconscious

n.
In Jungian psychology, a part of the unconscious mind, shared by a society, a people, or all humankind, that is the product of ancestral experience.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

collective unconscious

Psychiatry
A concept posited by Carl Gustav Jung regarding an inborn, symbol-rich psychological foundation common to humanity, which differs slightly according to the culture; he postulated that the collective unconsciousness reflected a group mindset, which would allow for telepathy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

col·lec·tive un·con·scious

(kŏ-lek'tiv ŭn-kon'shŭs)
psychology The combined engrams or memory potentials inherited from a person's phylogenetic past in C.G. Jung's theory.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

collective unconscious

An entity, deemed to be a kind of storehouse of ancestral memory, proposed by the Swiss psychiatrist and philosopher Karl Gustav Jung (1875–1961) to explain similarities in symbolism among disparate peoples.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
These interruptions mean there are no real message from the superconscious.
By arresting both breath and mind through controlled respiration, the objects of the senses are restrained and a continued voidness of conception ensues, leading ultimately to the fourth superconscious condition (turya, turiya) in which one's soul (atman) is free to dwell with the universal spirit (brahman).
People are now superconscious about drinking patterns for health and other compelling reasons such as rigid enforcement of driving laws."
Assagioli, vertical telepathy and superconscious awareness
Once a person is aware of the relationship s/he can have with the Higher Self, it is possible to establish communication from what Assagioli called the superconscious. This ability, to receive "from above," is also referred to as Vertical Telepathy.
In 1968 he produced not only Stimmung--that "masterpiece of the age of the hippie camp-fire" (Heyworth 1985)--and the fifteen "intuitive" text compositions of Aus den sieben Tagen, but also, in the "Charter for Youth" (Texte 3, 292-95), he called for music to be "the conversion into sound of a stream of superconscious cosmic electricity" (293), in order that "the engineers of intellect will at last lose their unholy war" (295).
Roberto Assagioli (1984) posited a superconscious, as well as subconscious, integrated transpersonal and depth psychology, as did Carl Jung.
The Higher Unconscious, or Superconscious, is intimately connected with the realm of the Transpersonal Self.
Psychic states are transpersonal, and utilize the higher chakras to gain access to the superconscious and collective unconscious.
Psychosynthesis, first formulated in 1910 by the Italian psychiatrist Assagioli (1971), is concerned with integrating material from the lower unconscious and with realizing and actualizing the content of the superconscious.
Early in his work he observed that repression of higher, superconscious impulses (altruistic love and will, humanitarian action, artistic and scientific inspiration, philosophic and spiritual insight, and the drive toward purpose and meaning in life) could be just as damaging to the psyche as repression of material from the lower unconscious.
Increase of the rate and the depth of breathing typically loosens the psychological defenses and leads to release and emergence of the unconscious (and superconscious) material.