superantigen

(redirected from Super-antigens)

superantigen

 [soo″per-an´tĭ-jen]
any of a group of powerful antigens occurring in various bacteria and viruses that bind outside of the normal T cell receptor site and are able to react with multiple T cell receptor molecules, thus activating T cells nonspecifically. Included are staphylococcal enterotoxins and toxins causing toxic shock syndrome and exfoliative dermatitis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

su·per·an·ti·gen

(sū'pĕr-an'ti-jen),
An antigen that interacts with the T-cell receptor in a domain outside the antigen recognition site. This interaction induces the activation of larger numbers of T cells than are induced by antigens that are presented in the antigen recognition site leading to the release of numerous cytokines. A single superantigen may potentially activate as much as 15% of the lymphocytic repertoire.
See also: antigen.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

superantigen

One of a class of molecules that react with a substantial proportion of the whole population of T cells in the body. They include Staphylococcus aureus ENTEROTOXINS. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) is a powerful T-cell mitogen and can give rise to the release of large quantities of CYTOKINES and LEUKOTRIENES. This is believed to be one of the bases of the TOXIC SHOCK SYNDROME.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This programme will aim to characterise the positive or negative effect of the drug candidate EPP-001 on the activation of the super-antigens in PJI clinical isolates of S.