sulfur

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sulfur

 [sul´fer]
a chemical element, atomic number 16, atomic weight 32.064, symbol S. (See Appendix 6.)
sulfur dioxide a colorless, nonflammable gas used as an antioxidant in pharmaceutical preparations; it is also an important air pollutant, irritating the eyes and respiratory tract.
precipitated sulfur a topical scabicide, antiparasitic, antibacterial, antifungal, and keratolytic.
sublimed sulfur a topical scabicide and antiparasitic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sul·fur (S),

(sŭl'fŭr),
An element, atomic no. 16, atomic wt. 32.066, that combines with oxygen to form sulfur dioxide and sulfur trioxide; these two compounds combine with water to make strong acids. Sulfur combines with many metals and nonmetallic elements to form sulfides; it is mildly laxative, and has been used to treat rheumatism, gout, bronchitis, and, externally, skin diseases.
Synonym(s): brimstone
[L. sulfur, brimstone, sulfur]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sulfur

The American spelling of sulphur, and the accepted spelling by the Internation Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sul·fur

(S) (sŭl'fŭr)
An element, atomic no. 16, atomic wt. 32.066, which combines with oxygen to form sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3); these combine with water to make strong acids, and with many metals and nonmetallic elements to form sulfides; used externally in the treatment of skin diseases.
Synonym(s): sulphur.
[L. sulfur, brimstone, sulfur]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sul·fur

(S) (sŭl'fŭr)
In oxide forms, added to water to make strong acids and used externally to treat skin diseases.
Synonym(s): sulphur.
[L. sulfur, brimstone, sulfur]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Sulfur isotope fractionation in modern euxinic systems: Implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions of paired sulfate-sulfide isotope records.
Recent studies have examined geological features, alteration, sulfur isotopes, dating of mineralization, and the origin of ore-forming fluids [12-20].
It should be emphasized that the sulfur isotope analysis gives information only on the geological source of the sulfur, and not on whether it has been recrystallized artificially.
The deposit characteristics (without postmagmatic alteration) and sulfur isotope characteristics excluded the abiogenic origin.
Tissue carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope turnover in transplanted Bathymodioluschildressi mussels: Relation to growth and physiological condition.
This intersection temperature is consistent with the independent temperature calculated from EPMA data of sphalerite (236-275[degrees]C) and/or the sulfur isotope equilibrium temperatures of sphalerite and galena pairs (237-267[degrees]C) within the analytic error.
In the study area, rapid sedimentation and burial occurred during the Late Permian to the Middle Cretaceous when the peak oils were expected to generate from the Cambrian, Silurian, and Upper Permian and the oils in reservoirs were cracked to gas and solid bitumen; thus, the generation and cracking of the oils are expected to occur in semiclosed or closed systems where the thermal processes may have no significant carbon and sulfur isotope fractionation; that is, kerogen and its final cracking product, solid bitumen, may have similar [delta][sup.13]C and [delta][sup.34]S values [12].
Using sulfur isotopes to determine the oxygen content of ~2.3 billion year-old rocks in the Transvaal Supergroup in South Africa, they found evidence of a sudden increase in atmospheric oxygen that broadly coincided with physical evidence of glacial debris, and geochemical evidence of a new world-order for the carbon cycle.
Sulfur isotope fractionation between S[O.sub.4] and [H.sub.2]S in the Ordovician lies between 8.7 [per thousand] and 12.3 [per thousand] with an average of 10.6%.
Sedimentary rocks created more than 2.4 billion years ago sometimes have an unusual sulfur isotope composition thought to be caused by the action of ultra violet light on volcanically produced sulfur dioxide in an oxygen poor atmosphere.
Sulfur isotopes also can provide an interesting label when high productivity in the water column leads to more organic matter settling to the seafloor and more sulfate reduction in benthic sediments (Peterson and Howarth, 1987).