sulfur

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sulfur

 [sul´fer]
a chemical element, atomic number 16, atomic weight 32.064, symbol S. (See Appendix 6.)
sulfur dioxide a colorless, nonflammable gas used as an antioxidant in pharmaceutical preparations; it is also an important air pollutant, irritating the eyes and respiratory tract.
precipitated sulfur a topical scabicide, antiparasitic, antibacterial, antifungal, and keratolytic.
sublimed sulfur a topical scabicide and antiparasitic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sul·fur (S),

(sŭl'fŭr),
An element, atomic no. 16, atomic wt. 32.066, that combines with oxygen to form sulfur dioxide and sulfur trioxide; these two compounds combine with water to make strong acids. Sulfur combines with many metals and nonmetallic elements to form sulfides; it is mildly laxative, and has been used to treat rheumatism, gout, bronchitis, and, externally, skin diseases.
Synonym(s): brimstone
[L. sulfur, brimstone, sulfur]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sulfur

The American spelling of sulphur, and the accepted spelling by the Internation Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sul·fur

(S) (sŭl'fŭr)
An element, atomic no. 16, atomic wt. 32.066, which combines with oxygen to form sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3); these combine with water to make strong acids, and with many metals and nonmetallic elements to form sulfides; used externally in the treatment of skin diseases.
Synonym(s): sulphur.
[L. sulfur, brimstone, sulfur]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sul·fur

(S) (sŭl'fŭr)
In oxide forms, added to water to make strong acids and used externally to treat skin diseases.
Synonym(s): sulphur.
[L. sulfur, brimstone, sulfur]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of Low-Temperature and Hot-Air Drying Methods for the Amount of Volatile Sulfur Compounds from A.
The standard catalyst used for this method are NiMo/Al2O3 and CoMo/Al2O3 [21].In this method the sulfur containing compound in crude oil is transformed in to hydrogen sulfide.HDS is fissile when conditions typically range from with respect to temperature 200-425 degree centigrade and with respect to pressure 1-18MPa [22].These conditions are depending on the nature of the sulfur compound which is in feed stock.HDS treatment is much favorable with a feed containing aliphatic sulfur compounds, because through HDS treatment sulfur completely removed from feed [23].Fig 3 shows the HDS treatment in a more summarize way.
It is clear that at lower sulfur compound concentration, the three adsorbents were effective in adsorbing the sulphur compound; however, it was found that with increasing the sulphur compound concentration, the effect of the adsorbents decreases.
Volatile sulfur compounds, such as thiols, are responsible for the ripe/fruity aromas of Sauvignon Blanc and are formed during fermentation.
The results of a detailed analysis of individual sulfur compounds in the feedstock and hydrogenated products are shown in Figure 4.
Sulfur compounds, which are no longer needed, are removed by passing the gas stream through cellulose.
One of the early predictions of this hypothesis was that there should be a sulfur compound made by organisms in the oceans that was stable enough against oxidation in water to allow its transfer to the air.
The levels of volatile sulfur compounds in mouth air from patients with chronic periodontitis.
Garlic (Allium sativum) is a member of the lily family and is rich in sulfur compounds including thiosulfinates, sulfoxides, and dithiins.
Even today, hardy microbes near deep-sea vents and in other oxygen-starved environments thrive by consuming sulfur compounds. With no oxygen to breathe, their ancient relatives apparently did the same and probably belched hydrogen sulfide - the rotten-smelling gas popular with high school chemistry teachers.
Studies have shown that high amounts of Cu2S typically indicate the presence of active sulfur compounds such as elemental sulfur, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), or organic sulfur compounds.
Both are rich sources of heart-protective compounds called "thiosulfinates." These sulfur compounds, best known for causing eyes to water, are thought to lower blood pressure and break up potentially harmful clusters of platelets in the bloodstream.