sulfite

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sulfite

 [sul´fīt]
a salt of sulfurous acid. Sulfites are used as preservatives for salad, fresh fruit and vegetables, wine, beer, and dried fruit. In susceptible individuals, especially those with asthma, they can cause a severe reaction; because of this their use has been curtailed, and foods that contain them must be labeled.

sul·fite

(sŭl'fīt),
A salt of sulfurous acid; elevated in cases of molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

sulfite

Sulfiting agent Food industry An agent used as a food preservative; up to 5% of asthmatics are sensitive to sulfites–possibly due to low levels of sulfite oxidase, and respond to sulfites with nausea, diarrhea, bronchospasm, pruritus, edema, hives, potentially anaphylactic shock and death; some drugs used for asthma may contain sulfiting agents. See Food allergies, Pseudoallergies.

sul·fite

(sŭl'fīt)
A salt of sulfurous acid; elevated in cases of molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

Sulfite

A type of preservative that causes allergic reactions in some people.
Mentioned in: Bronchodilators
References in periodicals archive ?
"As a consequence, you should have sulfites. And they said, 'Can you tell us how much of this molecule there would have been?' And that's what we set out to constrain."
Sulfite dosage was adjusted according to our previous studies, which were designed to investigate the effects of an increased sulfite intake (12,24,25).
Joe Krebs, Director of Protein Chemistry for Bioo Scientific: "The MaxSignal Sulfite Assay Kit is the latest addition to Bioo Scientific's existing line of enzymatic assays for the detection of additives and adulteration in food and feed samples.
Since wine is more than 80 water, the reaction, or disassociation, of molecular S[O.sub.2] into sulfites happens in much the same manner.
(The body normally converts sulfur to sulfites, then sulfates, but that metabolic process doesn't happen in sensitive people.) Those foods include garlic, onions, soy, peanuts, maple syrup, and vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, kale, and asparagus.
Sulfur dioxide preservatives, or sulfites, are one of the classes of chemicals widely used in winemaking.
Further, we demonstrated that sulfite oxidation mediated by Cu, Zn-SOD induced the formation of radical-derived 5,5-dimethyl- 1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) spin-trapped HSA radicals.
This is because, like many conventional wines, they include added sulfite preservatives to prevent oxidation and bacterial spoilage.
Sulfites are common additives in virtually all wines--red and white, including many organic wines.
Sinskey labels his wines "made with organic grapes" instead of "certified organic" because he, along with almost every other winemaker in the world, adds a small amount of sulfites, a preservative that prevents oxidation and bacterial spoilage.
By law, every bottle of wine sold in the United States must carry those two unsettling words, contains sulfites. Not only is the phrase a bit ominous, it's also a source of confusion.
CSPI's efforts have been critical to getting killer sulfites banned from salads; obtaining clear nutrition labels on packaged foods; persuading companies to remove cholesterol-raising tropical oils from many products; eliminating scores of deceptive advertisements; pressuring companies to offer healthier foods in supermarkets; revealing the calories, saturated fat, and sodium, in popular restaurant foods; and reducing levels of germs in meat and poultry.