sulcus sign


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sulcus sign

Orthopedics A joint laxity test used clinically to diagnose shoulder instability. See Laxity test, Shoulder instability. Cf Provocative test.

sul·cus sign

(sŭl'kŭs sīn)
A maneuver used to determine inferior instability of the glenohumeral joint, whereby traction is applied to the humerus. If the space widens between the acromion process and humeral head to produce an indentation, a positive test result is confirmed.
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A special tests battery for shoulder included Neer's test, Hawkins- Kennedy test for shoulder impingement, apprehension relocation test for anterior instability, sulcus sign for inferior instability, painful arc, Speed's test for long head of biceps, lift off test for subscapularis involvement (17) and resisted isometric contraction of supraspinatus (18).
35) Positive sulcus sign - Positive Speed's test 51 (60.
The patient had no evidence of generalized excessive joint laxity with a negative sulcus sign and no signs of posterior instability.
In 15 patients PA view even expiratory film was unable to diagnose pneumothorax, but opposite lateral decubitus view showed pneumothorax with collapsed lung border and deep sulcus sign.
Per il ginocchio sono stati eseguiti i Test del Cassetto anteriore e posteriore (17) (risultati positivi), per la spalla sono stati eseguiti il Load & Shift Test (risultato negativo), il Sulcus Sign (negativo), l'Apprehension Test (positivo) (18); per il rachide cervicale il Sharp Purser Test (19) (dolente ma senza segni di instabilita), il Test di stabilita latero-laterale C1-C2 (dolente ma senza segni di instabilita), il Cranial Cervical Flexion Test (CCFT) (20) e risultato visivamente positivo per attivazione compensatoria dei muscoli sternocleidomastoidei e scaleni, controllati visivamente e manualmente dal terapista.
More importantly, the other shoulder is examined looking for a sulcus sign (Fig.
Classical chest X-ray signs for a tension pneumothorax include a visible lung edge running parallel to the chest wall, hyperlucency, deep sulcus sign and abdominal quadrant hyperlucency.
While there are many methods of relocation, the key is traction inferiorly, If the patient has good range of motion and only mild pain, assess the instability of the joint using the apprehension sign, the posterior glide (jerk test), and the sulcus sign.
The most widely used tests are the apprehension test, the sulcus sign, and the load-and-shift test.
The crank test, drawer sign, load and shift test, relocation test, and sulcus sign, detailed in TABLE 2, (12-14) were all positive for shoulder instability; the Clunk and O'Brien tests were negative, and the contralateral shoulder exam was within normal limits.
An effective test for inferior or multidirectional shoulder instability is the sulcus sign, which is conducted with the patient seated with the arm to the side.