sulbactam

(redirected from Sulbactam sodium)
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sulbactam

 [sul-bak´tam]
a β-lactamase inhibitor used as the sodium salt to increase the antibacterial activity of penicillins and cephalosporins against β-lactamase–producing organisms.

sul·bac·tam

(sŭl-bak'tam),
A β-lactamase inhibitor with weak antibacterial action; when used in conjunction with penicillins (for example, ampicillin) with little β-lactamase-inhibiting action, it greatly increases their effectiveness against organisms that would ordinarily not be susceptible.

sulbactam

/sul·bac·tam/ (sul-bak´tam) a β-lactamase inhibitor used as the sodium salt to increase the antibacterial activity of penicillins and cephalosporins against β-lactamase–producing organisms.

sulbactam

(sŭl-băk′tăm)
n.
A compound, C8H11NO5S, that inhibits action of the enzyme beta-lactamase, thus counteracting bacterial resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. It is used in its sodium form in combination with antibiotics such as amoxicillin to treat infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

sul·bac·tam

(sŭl-bak'tam)
A β-lactamase inhibitor with weak antibacterial action; when used in conjunction with penicillins with little β-lactamase-inhibiting action, greatly increases their effectiveness against organisms that would ordinarily not be susceptible.

sul·bac·tam

(sŭl-bak'tam)
A β-lactamase inhibitor with weak antibacterial action; when used with penicillins with little β-lactamase-inhibiting action, it greatly increases their effectiveness.

sulbactam

an irreversible β-lactamase inhibitor which increases the activity of β-lactam antibiotics. Commonly used in combination with ampicillin and occasionally with cephalosporins.