suicide prevention

(redirected from Suicide treatment)

prevention

 [pre-ven´shun]
the keeping of something (such as an illness or injury) from happening.
fall prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as instituting special precautions with the patient at risk for injury from falling.
pressure ulcer prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the prevention of pressure ulcers for a patient at high risk for developing them.
primary prevention the first level of health care, designed to prevent the occurrence of disease and promote health.
religious addiction prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as prevention of a self-imposed controlling religious lifestyle. See also addiction.
secondary prevention the second level of health care, based on the earliest possible identification of disease so that it can be more readily treated or managed and adverse sequelae can be prevented.
shock prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as detecting and treating a patient at risk for impending shock.
sports-injury prevention: youth in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as reducing the risk of sport-related injury in young athletes.
substance use prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the prevention of an alcoholic or drug use lifestyle. See also substance abuse.
suicide prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as reducing risk of self-inflicted harm with intent to end life. See also suicide.
tertiary prevention the third phase or level of health care, concerned with promotion of independent function and prevention of further disease-related deterioration.

Patient discussion about suicide prevention

Q. What to do in a crisis or when you feel depressed? Hi Everybody - I found some great resources for people that feel despondent, suicidal, or simply need to speak to someone about their problems. You don't need to feel bad because there are numerous hotlines with highly trained operators available to help you. These hotlines are 100% FREE to use and completely ANONYMOUS. Please remember that these resources are not associated with iMedix at all. Suicide Prevention / Depression * USA: Hopeline (Suicide): 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) * USA: Suicide Hotline: 1-800-273-Talk (1-800-8255) * USA: Teen Hotline Covenant House NineLine: 1-800-999-9999 * USA: SOS Teen Hotline: 1-800-949-0057 * USA: Grief Recovery Helpline : 1-800-445-4808 * USA: Directory of local helplines / centers * UK: Samaritans (Nat'l and local): 08457 90 90 90 or jo@samaritans.org * Global directory of suicide hotlines - http://suicidehotlines.com/

A. I meant to write folks. sorry.

More discussions about suicide prevention
References in periodicals archive ?
The European Psychiatric Association (EPA) guidance on suicide treatment and prevention.
On the other hand the suicide treatment rarely happens in love happiness, light madness or swank feeling and this shows that the suicide treatment in bipolar patients is a phenomenan dependent on patients mood and extremity.
Most of the suicide treatments of these patients were during the harsh activities of the basic anxiety and less in emotional mixed period or boring love period.
In turn, chapters treat epidemiology, the theoretical context, the empirical context, assessment, an "integrative-eclectic approach to treatment," standards of care and malpractice in suicide treatment, and prevention.
Specific intervention techniques can include the following: developing written safety contracts, helping the client to identify the issue(s) she or he is trying to solve through the suicide and helping the client to find alternative methods of solving these problems, allowing the client to ventilate her or his feelings, arranging for social support to be provided by the client's available friends and family, collaborating with medical personnel to arrange for medical evaluation, and engaging suicide treatment therapies Two such therapies are dialectic behavioral therapy (DBT; Linehan, Armstrong, Suarez, Allman, & Heard, 1991) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT; Beck, 1986).
Yet, few suicide treatment models have attended to the role of emotions directly, although psychological pain has been identified as central to suicide (Hendin, 1981; Shneidman, 1996).
Two models of suicide treatment: Evaluation and recommendations.
Conclusions drawn from reviews of randomized controlled trials and uncontrolled studies of suicide treatments with adult samples are mixed at best.