sugary drink


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sugary drink

A term of art for sweetened beverages sold in 170 cc to 2-litre cans or bottles in developed countries, which have been targeted as major contributors to rising rates obesity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nutrition expert Dr Ian Johnson, from Quadram Institute Bioscience in Norwich - formerly the Institute of Food Research - said: "The results do suggest a mechanism whereby consumption of sugary drinks with meals might interfere with the body's ability to regulate energy intake, and eventually lead to weight gain.
The introduction of taxes on sugary drinks in Mexico and Berkeley, California, has demonstrated the industry's willingness to fight legislation that might lower its profits.
The report predicts that the sugary drinks tax can lead to some 3.
Women and men who increased their sugary drink consumption by one 12-ounce serving per day gained more weight over a period of time than those who didn't.
Sugary drinks - including soda, energy drinks, sports drinks, and fruit juice with added sugar - are a big source of empty calories in kids' diets and a big contributor to the obesity crisis.
The analysis took into account other factors that can affect the risk of high blood sugar, including sex, age, weight, and physical activity, as well as consumption of sugary drinks.
A four-judge panel of the state's Supreme Court Appellate Division, said that the city's Board of Health exceeded its authority when it passed the ban, which would have banned the sale of sugary drinks of larger than 16 ounces.
The students who then believed that willpower dwindled in the face of a challenge needed sugary drinks to focus, whereas the other students did not.
Researchers found that reducing the consumption of sugary drinks by an average of one serving per day could lower both your diastolic and systolic blood pressure readings a small, but significant amount.
Another quarter had a similar lunch box without a sugary drink and fewer than one in ten had lunch boxes with none of these items.
Replacing one daily serving of sugary drinks with water can lower a person's risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by up to 25 percent, according to new research published in April in Diabetologia.
Experts claim crisps and sugary drinks commercials like Gary Lineker's Walkers campaign and Beyonce's Pepsi promos help fuel childhood obesity.