plantation

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plantation

(plăn-tā′shŭn) [L. plantare, to plant]
Insertion of a tooth into the bony socket from which it may have been removed by accident, or transplantation of a tooth into the socket from which a tooth has just been removed. The transplanted tooth may come from the patient or a donor.
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Certainly, royal proclamations and clerical disapproval did not stop planters eager to use Indian labour in their attempt to gain great wealth from the territory's sugar plantations. But disease and the relative ease with which Indians could escape to the vast Brazilian hinterlands limited the extent to which Indian slavery was a viable option.
Now, in Decency and Excess, he draws on both old and new fieldwork to focus on the life of Haitian laborers on one of the remaining Dominican sugar plantations, Consuelo in Monte Coca.
But for Stinchcombe, the most significant, determining variable is the strength of the sugar plantation economy and location of the "sugar frontier." Where the plantation economy was more dynamic, planters had greater control, and the restrictions on slaves were more severe.
David Gaspar describes the agricultural cycle and work routines on Antigua sugar plantations. Michel-Rolph Trouillot surveys important structural differences between coffee and sugar plantations and their consequences for slave life and slave society.
Most of the 1,000 migrants worked on sugar plantations in the US during the 1980's and 1990's.
A clear majority of the millions of enslaved Africans who survived the Middle Passage ended up in Brazil and the Caribbean on sugar plantations whose size, sophisticated integration of production and processing, and intensive use of the factors of production translated into economic enterprises of the first rank.
The investors are among 15 investors already indicated interest in building sugar factories in Meanwhile, Forestry Ministry has granted the principle license to two companies to build sugar plantations and factories in Papua.
Regulations were introduced which compelled male refugees, under pain of repatriation, to be apprenticed to settlers at fixed wages for three years; the hated isibhalo system was also inaugurated: this imposed a direct tax in labour that compelled unmarried men to expend their energies (though for wages) on public works, or on the growing sugar plantations. There were also hut taxes levied, and a severe circumscription of the quantity of land allocated solely for African occupation.
Indonesia's sugar industry and sugar plantations have supported each other in development.
Roderick McDonald's comparative study of slavery on sugar plantations in Jamaica and Louisiana may not figure in the current debate about welfare and the black family, but it deserves a wide audience.
The program has expanded its sugar plantations form 43,548 hectares in 2005 to 52,461 hectares in 2009, and increased its sugar factory milling capacity from 23,556 TCD in 2005 to 28,031 TCD in 2009 and improved the sugar content from 6.74% to 7.72 %.
Identifying trends that closely resemble patterns evident on other Jamaican sugar plantations of the era, Dunn concludes that "virtually every one of [the women] labored in the cane fields, that most of them did this work for many years, and that collectively they performed much of the hardest sugar labor," in the process suffering impaired fertility and shortened life expectancy.