sugar

(redirected from Sugar crops)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Sugar crops: sugar corn, sugar sorghum

sugar

 [shoog´ar]
a sweet carbohydrate of either animal or vegetable origin; the two principal groups are the disaccharides and the monosaccharides.
beet sugar sucrose from sugar beets.
blood sugar
1. glucose occurring in the blood.
2. the amount of glucose in the blood.
cane sugar sucrose from sugar cane.
fruit sugar fructose.
invert sugar a mixture of equal amounts of dextrose and fructose, obtained by hydrolyzing sucrose; used in solution as a parenteral nutrient.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sug·ar

(shu'găr), Avoid the colloquial substitution of this word for glucose unless the meaning is clear from the context.
One of the sugars, which see, pharmaceutical forms are compressible sugar and confectioner's sugar.
See also: sugars.
[G. sakcharon; L. saccharum]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sugar

(sho͝og′ər)
n.
1. A sweet crystalline or powdered substance, white when pure, consisting of sucrose obtained mainly from sugarcane and sugar beets and used in many foods, drinks, and medicines to improve their taste. Also called table sugar.
2. Any of a class of water-soluble crystalline carbohydrates, including sucrose and lactose, having a characteristically sweet taste and classified as monosaccharides, disaccharides, and trisaccharides.

sug′ar·er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sugar

A water-soluble, crystallizable carbohydrate that is the primary source of energy and structural components. See Amino sugar, Non-reducing sugar, Reducing sugar.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sug·ar

(shug'ăr)
Colloquial usage for sucrose; pharmaceutic forms include compressible sugar and confectioner's sugar.
See also: sugars
[G. sakcharon; L. saccharum]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sugar

a simple form of CARBOHYDRATE, formed of MONOSACCHARIDE units. Such molecules can exist in either a straight chain or a ring form. The straight chain contains a C=O group; if this group is terminal the sugar has the properties of an aldehyde (aldose sugar), if nonterminal the sugar acts as a ketone (ketose sugar). Both aldose and ketose sugars can be oxidized and will reduce alkaline copper solutions (see FEHLING'S TEST, BENEDICT'S TEST). They are thus called REDUCING SUGARS. Several disaccharides such as maltose and lactose are also reducing sugars. Sucrose, however, is a nonreducing sugar in which the linkage of glucose and fructose masks the potential aldehyde group of glucose and the potential ketone group of fructose, so that no reduction occurs in the Fehling's and Benedict's tests.

The backbone of the sugar can be of varying lengths, containing as little as three carbons (triose sugars) but, more commonly five carbons (pentose sugar) and six carbons (hexose sugars).

Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

sug·ar

(shug'ăr)
One of the sugars, e.g., confectioners' sugar.
[G. sakcharon; L. saccharum]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about sugar

Q. how high is to high sugar I have been to surgry 3 times in 2 months and I have had my sugar go over before but not like this. I went to the Dr and Hes not worried about it. In the morning it is running 124 to 143 and 2 hrs after I eat it is running 165 to 200. At the Dr office it only showed 5.6 and He said 6.5 and over is bad! I have never sugar this high ever! It is in the family, my Mom, her Mom, her Dad ECT. What do you all think about it!

A. It seems what the doctor was referring to at the office wasn't the blood glucose (sugar) measurements but rather HbA1c - a substance in the blood that reflects the sugar levels in the PAST 8-12 weeks. Surgery is a substantial stress to your body and thus can increase your blood sugar. The A1C reflects the average levels during that time so it may overcome the temporary elevation due to the surgery.

You may read more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HbA1c

Q. Is there any difference in sugar. Is there any difference in sugar between flavored milk and fruit drinks or carbonated soft drinks?

A. Yes …Flavored milk contains both natural and added sugars and has less added sugar than carbonated soft drinks. It has been found that flavored milk just contributes only 2-4 % of total added sugar in kid’s diets as compared to 50-60 percent or more by soft and fruit drinks.

Q. i have high sugar problem .. how can i reduce it to a normal levels? and what medications can help me?

A. You can watch your diet and limit the amount of sugar you consume (avoid sugar containing food and drinks). In addition, watching your weight and limiting the fat and carbohydrates in your diet is also very helpful. Daily physical activity is known to be very helpful for glucose level problems, and of course medication, if necessary. You should consult a doctor about which medications to take, depending on your glucose levels. It can be either pills or insulin injections.

More discussions about sugar
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
References in periodicals archive ?
* ARS develops value-added bioproducts for different sugar crop byproducts.
The experts visited the sugar beet trials at three locations in Sindh Sugar crop research institute at Tando Jam Agriculture research centre
Of the various crop rotations and inter-cropping, the combination of sugar crops (i.e.
Define and give an example of the following nutritional crop use categories: sugar crops, oil crops, protein crops, and starchy seed crops.
Gas and oil prices spiked, and sugar crops took a beating.
Ethanol production involves fermenting and distilling starch and sugar crops. In the early stages, liquefied starch is converted to sugar (dextrose), which is then fermented.
* In Brazil, more than 80 percent of new cars run on both ethanol and gasoline, and the country has cut oil imports by $400 billion thanks to its sugar crops. Both fuels are available almost everywhere in the country, and since ethanol can cost about a third less than gas at current prices (although the mileage isn't as good), the homegrown fuel is very popular.
Ethanol can be produced from a wide variety of plant-based feedstocks, most commonly grain or sugar crops. It then is blended with gasoline as an oxygenate or fuel extender for use in automobiles, or it can be used alone in "flexible-fuel vehicles" that run on any blend of ethanol and gasoline.
The Curry Report stated: "England needs a long-term strategy for creating and exploiting opportunities in non-food cropsa Bio-ethanol, which is made from starch and sugar crops, can be used to run petrol engines.
The farm value of Hawaii sugar crops, minus processing, was only $57.8 million, even though the sugar crops occupied 46 percent of state ag lands.
Low prices for soy beans, corn, wheat, barley, and rice have reduced producer returns for these alternative crops, leading to increases in acreage for sugar crops. Large supplies are also expected in 2000/01.
ROOT CHICORY AND JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE are alternative sugar crops which accumulate linear fructose polymers (fructans) in their roots and tubers, respectively.