succimer

succimer

 [suk´sĭmer]
a chelating agent that is an analogue of dimercaprol, administered orally in the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. A complex with technetium 99m is used in renal function testing.

succimer

A water-soluble chelator administered per os for heavy metal poisoning–eg, lead poisoning in children > 2.17 µmol/L–US: 45 µg/dl or adults with lead poisoning due to gunshot wounds. See Lead, Saturnine gout.

Succimer (Chemet)

A drug used to remove excess lead from the body.
Mentioned in: Lead Poisoning
References in periodicals archive ?
Dimercaptosuccinic acid (succimer; DMSA) in inorganic lead poisoning.
The poison-control team was consulted upon admission and recommended starting the patient on succimer, as a chelating agent, to be given in a dose of 500 mg every eight hours for the first 5 days then every twelve hours for the 14 days.
Food and Drug Administration in 1991 approved an oral chelator called dimercaptosuccinic acid, or succimer. Today, succimer is used most often for chelation, although calcium disodium EDTA and dimercaprol are still used in some cases.
Succimer, an oral chelating agent used to remove lead and heavy metals from the body, was recommended by the Southeast Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit and the Florida Poison Information Center Tampa for seven patients.
Chelation agents include the oral agent succimer, the intramuscular agent dimercaprol, and the intravenous agent CaEDTA [19-21].
Lead induced oxidative stress and its recovery following co-administration of melatonin or N-acetylcysteine during chelation with succimer in male rats.
The treatment of lead poisoning from gunshot wounds with succimer (DMSA).
Succimer treatment and calcium supplementation reduce tissue lead in suckling rats.
The analysis of patient data from 1,280 individuals in nine cohort studies also showed a polymorphonuclear cell count of greater than 60% nearly doubled the risk while the presence of grades IV-V vesicoureteral reflux was associated with a 22-fold increase in the likelihood of renal scarring, defined as presence of photopenia on a technetium Tc 99m succimer renal scan.
There are six agents available to treat heavy metal (arsenic, gold, iron, lead, and mercury) intoxication: de-ferasirox (iron), deferoxamine (iron), dimercaprol (arsenic, gold, lead, and mercury), edetate calcium disodium (lead), penicillamine (copper and mercury), and succimer (lead).
Succimer chelation improves learning, attention, and arousal regulation in lead-exposed rats but produces lasting cognitive impairment in the absence of lead exposure.