subtype

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subtype

1. A gene that has a small mutation in its nucleotide sequence.
2. An organism that carries or expresses an allele with a minor variation that distinguishes it from other members of the species.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Our initial approach applies our Cancer Subtype Platform (CSP) to parse the complexity of tumor biology and generate genomic signatures.
This is important because patients with subtype 1, unlike subtype 2, often do not respond well to medications and develop strictures - extreme narrowing of the gut tube, requiring surgery once it develops.
There were significant differences in OS according to the LVI in the distribution of luminal A ( P = 0.002), luminal B ( P = 0.024), luminal HER2 ( P < 0.001), and TN ( P = 0.033) subtypes. There were also significant differences in the RFS in the luminal B, luminal HER2, and HER2 subtypes ( P = 0.004, <0.001, and 0.024, respectively).
These etiologies are generally uncommon, and their proportions are influenced by the presence of other etiological subtypes.[1]
The most common stroke subtypes were large artery atherosclerosis (n=140; 59,6%), followed by small vessel disease (n=65,2;27,7%), undetermined etiology (n=23; 9,8%), cardioembolism (n=5;2,1%), and other determined etiology (n=2;0,9%).
According to current nomenclature, subtype 1 is erythematotelangiectatic rosacea characterized by facial redness; subtype 2 is papulopustular (PPR), marked by bumps and pimples; subtype 3 is phymatous, characterized by enlargement of the nose; and subtype 4 is ocular, marked by eye irritation.
Conclusion: Molecular subtypes of breast cancer were found to be statistically significant predictor of PCR after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
The p-value was significant for EBV antigen positivity in the subtypes of Hodgkin Lymphoma.
We conducted phylogenetic reconstructions of each gene segment by the maximum-likelihood method using a dataset with all H1N2 subtype sequences and some representative sequences for H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes available in influenza genetic databases (online Technical Appendix, http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/EID/article/23/1/161122-Techapp1.pdf).
The Cancer Genome Atlas projects have classified tumors into subtypes that share distinct molecular and genetic features.