subliminal

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subliminal

 [sub-lim´ĭ-nal]
below the threshold of sensation or conscious awareness.

sub·lim·i·nal

(sŭb-lim'i-năl),
Below the threshold of perception or excitation; below the limit or threshold of consciousness.
[sub- + L. limen (limin-), threshold]

subliminal

/sub·lim·i·nal/ (-lim´ĭ-n'l) below the threshold of sensation or conscious awareness.

subliminal

(sŭb-lĭm′ə-nəl)
adj. Psychology
1. Below the threshold of conscious perception. Used of stimuli.
2. Inadequate to produce conscious awareness but able to evoke a response: subliminal propaganda.

sub·lim′i·nal·ly adv.

subliminal

[-lim′inəl]
Etymology: L, sub + limen, threshold
taking place below the threshold of sensory perception or outside the range of conscious awareness.

sub·lim·i·nal

(sŭb-lim'i-năl)
Below the threshold of perception or excitation; below the limit or threshold of consciousness.
[sub- + L. limen (limin-), threshold]

subliminal

(of stimuli) below the level that would result in a response.

subliminal

at a level below sensory threshold

sub·lim·i·nal

(sŭb-lim'i-năl)
Below threshold of perception, excitation, or consciousness.
[sub- + L. limen (limin-), threshold]

subliminal,

adj below the threshold of sensory perception or outside the range of conscious awareness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bullock also discusses research that he says is private, unlike the public research published in journals, and states: "The bulk of subliminal research, in contrast, has been conducted in secret by advertising and marketing firms.
Bullock does address advertising's perspective, starting with the true statement: "Advertisers deny they use subliminal techniques" (Bullock 2004a, 107).
The competitive pressures of the marketplace force them to use subliminal techniques, and at the same time require them to deny they do so" (123).
Even when Bullock (2004a) quotes advertising professionals who say that they do not use subliminal advertising, he couches it with a subhead "Protesting Too Much" (130).
Bullock takes a Freudian turn by suggesting that the real reason no one admits to using subliminal techniques is that we do not want to accept the truth about ourselves.
Bullock includes a "How to Use Subliminal Techniques" section in his book.
Therein lies the basic problem in that the public fear of subliminal advertising all requires them to believe there exists a deep, dark conspiracy of secrecy.
All the psychology studies are assumed to be pristine, while those against subliminal advertising are somehow flawed.
The back cover of Bullock's (2004a) book states, "August Bullock is an attorney who presents the evidence of subliminal advertising as though he were addressing a jury.
Bullock also notes that the study of subliminal techniques is not included in most curricula.
That is, he blames those who do not see the ambiguity and the subliminal messages as being threatened by the idea.
Perhaps, it is the ethical implications, as mentioned above, that makes subliminal advertising a sensitive subject for those working in the advertising business.