subliminal

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subliminal

 [sub-lim´ĭ-nal]
below the threshold of sensation or conscious awareness.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sub·lim·i·nal

(sŭb-lim'i-năl),
Below the threshold of perception or excitation; below the limit or threshold of consciousness.
[sub- + L. limen (limin-), threshold]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

subliminal

(sŭb-lĭm′ə-nəl)
adj. Psychology
1. Below the threshold of conscious perception. Used of stimuli.
2. Inadequate to produce conscious awareness but able to evoke a response: subliminal propaganda.

sub·lim′i·nal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sub·lim·i·nal

(sŭb-lim'i-năl)
Below the threshold of perception or excitation; below the limit or threshold of consciousness.
[sub- + L. limen (limin-), threshold]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

subliminal

(of stimuli) below the level that would result in a response.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

sub·lim·i·nal

(sŭb-lim'i-năl)
Below threshold of perception, excitation, or consciousness.
[sub- + L. limen (limin-), threshold]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Privacy advocates have suggested that subliminal advertising is used in profiling consumers (Simpson 1999).
What Gary Gray (2000) notes about the Bush "RATS" ads is true of many so-called subliminal examples: "If you can see it, it does not qualify as subliminal ..." (9).
Another way the word "subliminal" often is misused is to mean "suggestive" or "sexual." Wilson Bryan Key's first three books Subliminal Seduction, Media Sexploitation, and The Clam-Plate Orgy--proved popular and have fueled the subliminal controversy by focusing on embedded symbols.
The author also deals with the question, "Is it legal?" While attempts have been unsuccessfully made to ban subliminal advertising, there is no federal or state law that prohibits it in print advertising.
"OK, so why bother with subliminal advertising?" is the $64,000 question raised in the book.
Third, is what Haberstroh calls the "devil made me do it" theory or what I would call the failure to accept responsibility for our own actions: if we feel uncomfortable about our consumption of certain products (many so-called subliminal ads are for "sin" products such as liquor and cigarettes) or otherwise experience cognitive dissonance, it is much more comfortable to blame certain mysterious forces beyond our control rather than blaming ourselves.
The purpose of this research study was to determine whether advertising agencies, media production companies, or their clients in the United States have purposely and consciously developed and used subliminal advertising in order to elicit a predictable response from their target consumer.
If subliminal advertising is used, any or all of these individuals may be in a position to know about it, and the inclusion of these different groups has the effect of casting the widest net in order to maximize the opportunity for a positive response.
A four-page booklet-style questionnaire was designed to investigate beliefs about subliminal advertising, experience with it at any former employment settings, experience with it at the current employment setting, and demographics.