subculture

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Related to Subcultural capital: Cultural capital

subculture

 [sub´kul-chur]
1. a culture of bacteria derived from another culture.
2. a group whose members share characteristics, have similar needs, and develop behavioral norms not common to all members of the larger cultural group within which the smaller group exists.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb-kŭl'chūr),
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture; a method used to prolong the life of a particular strain where there is a tendency to degeneration in older cultures.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.

subculture

(sŭb′kŭl′chər)
n.
1. A cultural subgroup differentiated by status, ethnic background, residence, religion, or other factors that functionally unify the group and act collectively on each member.
2. One culture of microorganisms derived from another.

sub·cul′tur·al adj.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb'kŭl-chŭr)
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture; a method used to prolong the life of a particular strain where there is a tendency to degeneration in older cultures or to transfer organisms to a medium containing nutrients, reagents, dyes, or other substances to favor growth or facilitate identification.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb'kŭl-chŭr)
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although subcultural capital can explain the status and influence one can attain within a subculture, Thornton's theory has been criticized in several ways.
Subcultural capital has been examined for two decades, analyzing topics that range from subjects like nightclubs and raves to goth and hardcore punk.
In order to better understand and explain Chance the Rapper's quick and unconventional commercial success through the lens of subcultural capital, twenty music industry professionals familiar with Chance the Rapper's success were interviewed.
As was established earlier, "hipness" and relevance are crucial to obtaining and maintaining subcultural capital, which explains why Chance the Rapper's mixtapes on SoundCloud and DatPiff resonated with so many of his early fans.
Jensen references author Tammy Anderson (2013, 46) in explaining, "Anderson suggests fans of particular genres, as well as the general public, are provided a cultural resource in the determination of 'alternative' or 'underground' identity and its distinction from the 'mainstream.'" The "cultural resource" being provided here is subcultural capital. Although there are social forces that typically determine music tastes and products for a larger, common society, these subcultures praise separation from it.
ALBUM BOTH MIXTAPE * Backed and * Final audio * Recorded and distributed by a quality is distributed record label polished independently * Produced with * Recorded as * Produced with the intention solo projects the intention of of selling many or with groups attracting new fans units or special * Created as a full * Created to guests project, but may generate singles generate singles or for radio airplay receive radio airplay * Overall purpose: * Overall purpose: to to generate gain exposure revenue Chance the Rapper's devout independence as an artist awards him a high level of subcultural capital as it provides him a status defined by his opposition to mainstream music methodologies and is intricately tied to the independent (and, thus, "hip") method of marketing oneself as an artist.
As a result of his resistance to the mainstream music industry, Chance the Rapper cultivated a "cool factor" that is often necessary in order to gain subcultural capital (Thornton 1996, 11).
One must consider the role of mainstream media in the existence of subcultural capital to properly evaluate the concept's power and significance.
(Interview 2017) With nothing to oppose, there can be no subcultural capital. While Chance the Rapper's career is rooted in opposition to it, the mainstream media plays an important role in his widespread popularity and his status as a household name.
At this intersection, he acquires subcultural capital, which pushes his success further by heightening his status and distinguishing him as an artist.
Its use is disapproved, and it reduces one's subcultural capital, thus lowering one's position within the club cultural context.
Thornton, S., Club Cultures: Music, Media and Subcultural Capital. Hanover and London: Wesleyan University Press, 1996.