subconscious

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Related to Subcounscious: subconscious mind

subconscious

 [sub-kon´shus]
1. imperfectly or partially conscious.
2. a term formerly used to include the preconscious and unconscious.

sub·con·scious

(sŭb-kon'shŭs),
1. Not wholly conscious.
2. Denoting an idea or impression that is present in the mind, but of which there is at the time no conscious knowledge or realization.
3. That part of the mind that is outside conscious awareness.

subconscious

/sub·con·scious/ (sub-kon´shus)
1. imperfectly or partially conscious.
2. formerly, the preconscious and unconscious considered together.

subconscious

(sŭb-kŏn′shəs)
adj.
Not wholly conscious; partially or imperfectly conscious: subconscious perceptions.
n.
The part of the mind below the level of conscious perception. Often used with the.

sub·con′scious·ly adv.
sub·con′scious·ness n.

subconscious

[-kon′shəs]
Etymology: L, sub + conscire, to be aware
a lay or popular term for unconscious, or partially conscious. subconsciousness, n.

subconscious

Neurology Obtunded, see there.

sub·con·scious

(sŭb-kon'shŭs)
1. Not wholly conscious.
2. Denoting an idea or impression that is present in the mind, even though there is at the time no conscious knowledge or realization of it.

subconscious

1. Of mental processes and reactions occurring without conscious perception.
2. The large store of information of which only a small part is in consciousness at any time, but which may be accessed at will with varying degrees of success.
3. In psychoanalytic theory, a ‘level’ of the mind through which information passes on its way ‘up’ to full consciousness from the unconscious mind. Compare CONSCIOUS, UNCONSCIOUS.

sub·con·scious

(sŭb-kon'shŭs)
1. Not wholly conscious.
2. Denoting an idea or impression present in the mind, but of which there is at the time no conscious knowledge or realization.

subconscious,

n the state in which mental processes take place without the mind's being distinctly conscious of its own activity.