subclavian vein

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sub·cla·vi·an vein

[TA]
the direct continuation of the axillary vein at the lateral border of the first rib; it passes medially to join the internal jugular vein and form the brachiocephalic vein on each side.
Synonym(s): vena subclavia [TA]

subclavian vein

n.
A part of a major vein of the upper extremities or forelimbs that passes beneath the clavicle and is continuous with the axillary vein.

subclavian vein

the continuation of the axillary vein in the upper body, extending from the lateral border of the first rib to the sternal end of the clavicle, where it joins the internal jugular to form the brachiocephalic vein. It usually contains a pair of valves near its junction with the internal jugular vein. The subclavian vein receives deoxygenated blood from the external jugular vein and, on the left side, at the junction with the internal jugular vein, receives lymph from the thoracic duct. On the right side, at the corresponding junction, it receives lymph from the right lymphatic duct.
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Subclavian vein

sub·cla·vi·an vein

(sŭb-klā'vē-ăn vān) [TA]
The direct continuation of the axillary vein at the lateral border of the first rib; it passes medially to join the internal jugular vein and form the brachiocephalic vein on each side.
Synonym(s): vena subclavia [TA] .
References in periodicals archive ?
Though Wilson and Associates popularised subclavian vein catheterisation, Shapira et al recommended its discontinuation due to serious complications of pneumothorax and haemothorax.
Triplex color doppler study revealed complete thrombosis of right internal jugular vein, right proximal brachiocephalic vein with partial thrombosis in right subclavian vein.
At the root of the neck, it arches laterally opposite the transverse process of C7 vertebra and finally turns downwards to terminate in the angle formed by the junction of the left internal jugular vein and the left subclavian vein (Dutta).
sup][1],[2] Thus, the axillary vein puncture has been proposed as an alternative technique to the conventional subclavian vein access.
One week later, a repeat venogram demonstrated partial removal of the thrombus and an area of compression on the inferior aspect of the subclavian vein due to a cervical band (figure id).
It is opined that the average safe insertion depth for a central venous catheter from the left or right subclavian vein is 16.
A right upper extremity venogram showed complete thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian vein (Figure 2A).
The catheter tip position has also been proposed to be predictable from clinical judgements in adults, and intravascular distances from the cannulation site to the SCV-atrial junction have been determined and reported for both the internal jugular and subclavian veins (18,19).
There were three patients (3%) who had attempts performed on both subclavian veins at the same sitting, with successful placement accomplished, and one patient (1%) in whom the attempt to place a line failed.
UEDVT commonly implies thrombosis of the axillary and/or subclavian veins and is classified as primary or secondary on the basis of pathogenesis.