stylohyoid ligament

(redirected from Stylohyoid ligaments)

sty·lo·hy·oid lig·a·ment

[TA]
a fibrous cord that passes from the tip of the styloid process to the lesser cornu of the hyoid bone; it is occasionally ossified.

sty·lo·hy·oid lig·a·ment

(stī-lō-hīoyd ligă-mĕnt) [TA]
Ligament that connects the styloid process and the hyoid bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1-3) There is some evidence to suggest that there may also be a correlation between ossification of the stylohyoid ligaments and ligamentous ossification of the cervical spine in patients with DISH.
Regardless, the clinical findings of neck pain, throat irritation, mild dysphagia, and ossified stylohyoid ligaments were compatible with a diagnosis of Eagle syndrome.
Eagle's syndrome: a case of symptomatic calcification of the stylohyoid ligaments. J Can Chiropr Assoc 2003;47(1):21-27.
The styloid process may vary in length and sometimes stylohyoid ligament may also ossify from its origin at the styloid process to its attachment at the hyoid bone mimicking elongated styloid process.
Computed tomography (CT) of the neck with 3-dimensional reconstruction images was then obtained, which indicated that the patient had bilateral calcified stylohyoid ligaments to the level of the hyoid bone, with no other pathologic findings (figures 1 and 2).
Eagle Syndrome was first described in 1937 by Eagle as elongation of the styloid process causing pharyngeal pain, (1) and it is now thought to be an assemblage of symptoms resulting from elongation of the styloid process or progressive calcification of the stylohyoid ligament. (2) Patients with Eagle syndrome often report symptoms that include dysphagia, otalgia, throat pain, globus sensation, facial pain, headache, taste disturbances, and dental pain (2) that worsen with chewing, head and tongue movements, and swallowing.
Eagle syndrome is a rare condition where elongated temporal styloid processes or calcified stylohyoid ligaments are in conflict with the adjacent anatomical structures giving rise to a complex range of symptoms including otalgia dysphagia foreign body sensation in throat pain along carotid artery distribution and others.
Calcification of either one or both stylohyoid ligaments has been associated with difficult laryngoscopy (17-19).
However, computed tomographic (CT) angiography demonstrated that the styloid processes were elongated and the stylohyoid ligaments were calcified bilaterally (figure 1).
Eagle's Syndrome is a rare clinical condition, which often presents with recurrent pain in the oropharynx and face, foreign body sensation in the throat, dysphagia and referred otalgia due to an elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament. (1,2)
Between these two bones it becomes ligamentous and forms stylohyoid ligament. (3) Reichert's cartilage is divided into a dorsal segment (Which forms stapes), tympanohyal, stylohyal, epihyal and ceratohyal.
The symptoms of Eagle's syndrome are a foreign-body sensation in the throat, dysphagia, and intermittent facial pain related to an elongated styloid process and a calcified stylohyoid ligament. (1) The case illustrated here is that of a 45-year-old woman who had experienced an acute trauma to the neck.