Strong Interest Inventory


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Strong Interest Inventory

(strong)
[Edward K. Strong, U.S. psychologist, b. 1884]
,

SII

A psychological test that traditionally measures vocational interests but also identifies personality traits. Previous versions (the original was developed in 1927) were known as the Strong Vocational Interest Bank.
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Strong Interest Inventory: The Strong Interest Inventory was first published as the Strong Vocational Interest Blank in 1927.
We conclude therefore that respondents' color preferences as assessed by the Dewey Color System Test are indeed powerful predictors of all Basic Interest Scales of the Strong Interest Inventory.
Strong Interest Inventory application and technical guide.
Next, the explanatory power of the General Occupational Themes (GOTs) and the more specific Basic Interest Scales (BISs) and Personal Style Scales (PSSs) of the Strong Interest Inventory (SII; Harmon, Hansen, Borgen, & Hammer, 1994) is examined along with measures of vocationally relevant self-efficacy.
Cultural validity of Holland's theory and the Strong Interest Inventory for five racial/ethnic groups.
Rottinghaus, Lindley, Green, and Borgen found that self-efficacy, personality, interests, and the learning environment subscale of the Strong Interest Inventory (SII; Harmon, Hansen, Borgen, & Hammer, 1994) predicted educational aspirations among college students.
Strong Interest Inventory [SSI]), this section of our review is not organized according to whether the research was conducted with an international sample or with one from the United States.
Self-assessments, such as the Self-Directed Search (Holland, 1985) or the Strong Interest Inventory (Harmon, Hansen, Borgen, & Hammer, 1994), may help her understand the unique aspects of her personality and which occupational areas might be the most congruent with her interest patterns.
Gathering this information about Laura may be accomplished through the administration of the Strong Interest Inventory (Harmon, Hansen, Borgen, & Hammer, 1994), the Skills Confidence Inventory (Betz, Borgen, & Harmon, 1996), and other formal career assessments.
Some of these tests are the Strong Interest Inventory (Harmon, Hansen, Borgen, & Hammer, 1994), the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (Myers & Myers, 1984), and the Self-Directed Search (Holland, 1994).
Assessments chosen by the counselor (Super's Career Development, Assessment, and Counseling [Osborne, Brown, Niles, & Milner, 1997], the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator [Myers, McCaulley, Quenk, & Hammer, 1998], and the Strong Interest Inventory [Harmon, Hanson, Borgen, & Hammer, 1994]) confirmed Sarah's mismatch with her current position.
In Hong Kong, both the Self-Directed Search (SDS) and the Strong Interest Inventory (SII) as well as the Skill Confidence Inventory have been used in high school and university settings (Leung & Harmon, 1999; Leung & Hou, 2001).