stricture

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Related to Strictures: Barrett esophagus, toxic megacolon

stenosis

 [stĕ-no´sis] (pl. steno´ses)
an abnormal narrowing or contraction of a body passage or opening; called also arctation, coarctation, and stricture.
aortic stenosis obstruction to the outflow of blood from the left ventricle into the aorta; in the majority of adult cases the etiology is degenerative calcific disease of the valve.
hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis) a cardiomyopathy of unknown cause, in which the left ventricle is hypertrophied and the cavity is small; it is marked by obstruction to left ventricular outflow.
mitral stenosis a narrowing of the left atrioventricular orifice (mitral valve) due to inflammation and scarring; the cause is almost always rheumatic heart disease. Normally the leaflets open with each pulsation of the heart, allowing blood to flow from the left atrium into the left ventricle, and close as the ventricle fills again so that they prevent a backward flow of blood. In mitral stenosis there is a resultant increase of pressure in the pulmonary artery and hypertrophy of the left ventricle. The usual treatment is surgical replacement of the valve.
pulmonary stenosis (PS) narrowing of the opening between the pulmonary artery and the right ventricle.
pyloric stenosis see pyloric stenosis.
renal artery stenosis narrowing of one or both renal arteries by atherosclerosis or by fibrous dysplasia or hyperplasia, so that renal function is impaired (see ischemic nephropathy). Increased renin release by the affected kidney causes renovascular hypertension, and bilateral stenosis may result in chronic renal failure.
spinal stenosis narrowing of the vertebral canal, nerve root canals, or intervertebral foramina of the lumbar spine, caused by encroachment of bone upon the space; symptoms are caused by compression of the cauda equina and include pain, paresthesias, and neurogenic claudication. The condition may be either congenital or due to spinal degeneration.
subaortic stenosis aortic stenosis due to an obstructive lesion in the left ventricle below the aortic valve, causing a pressure gradient across the obstruction within the ventricle. See also idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis.
subglottic stenosis stenosis of the trachea below the glottis. A congenital form results in neonatal stridor or laryngotracheitis, often requiring tracheotomy but resolving with age. An acquired form is caused by repeated intubations.
tracheal stenosis scarring of the trachea with narrowing, usually as a result of injury from an artificial airway or trauma.
tricuspid stenosis (TS) narrowing or stricture of the tricuspid orifice of the heart, a condition often seen in patients with severe congestive heart failure, usually the result of volume overload and pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular and tricuspid annular dilation.

stric·ture

(strik'chūr),
A circumscribed narrowing or stenosis of a hollow structure, usually consisting of cicatricial contracture or deposition of abnormal tissue.
[L. strictura, fr. stringo, pp. strictus, to draw tight, bind]

stricture

/stric·ture/ (strik´chur) stenosis.

stricture

(strĭk′chər)
n.
An abnormal narrowing of a bodily duct or passage.

stricture

[strik′chər]
Etymology: L, stringere, to tighten
an abnormal temporary or permanent narrowing of the lumen of a hollow organ, such as the esophagus, pylorus of the stomach, ureter, or urethra. It is caused by inflammation, external pressure, or scarring. Treatment varies depending on the cause. Compare spasm.

stricture

The closing of a luminal structure. See Biliary stricture, Esophageal stricture, Stenosis, Urethral stricture.

stric·ture

(strik'shŭr)
A circumscribed narrowing or stenosis of a tube, duct, or hollow structure, such as the esophagus or urethra, usually consisting of cicatricial contracture or deposition of abnormal tissue. May be congenital or acquired. If acquired, may result from infection, trauma, muscular spasm, or mechanical or chemical irritation.
[L. strictura, fr. stringo, pp. strictus, to draw tight, bind]

stricture

Narrowing of a body passage.

Stricture

An abnormal narrowing or tightening of a body passage. LGV can cause strictures to form in the patient's rectum, or in the vagina of female patients.

stricture

an abnormal narrowing of a duct or passage, e.g. cervix, esophagus. See also stenosis and specific anatomic sites.

rectal stricture of pigs
see rectal stricture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Total number of 40 patients of dysphagia due to benign oesophageal strictures were studied, out of which, 16 (40%) patients were of corrosive strictures, 14 (35%) having achalasia cardia and 10 (25%) of peptic strictures (Table 1).
In order to assess the length and location of the stricture, intravenous, antegrade or retrograde urography and dynamic synthgrapy were used.
7-10] Improved survival has increased the number of children with oesophageal anastomotic strictures referred for treatment, and they now account for 35.
Ureteroileal strictures after urinary diversion with an ileal segment--is there a place for endourological treatment at all?
In the recent years advances in understanding the etiology, pathogenesis and diagnosis have resulted in evolvement of various modes of treatment of anterior urethral strictures.
6 It was demonstrated that radiographic technique consistently underestimate the length of anterior urethral strictures compared to intra operative measurements.
Earlier studies suggested that repeated urethrotomy for recurrent urethral strictures may serve to 'stabilize' the stricture, thereby increasing the cumulative success rate.
In his history, it was learned that repeated esophageal balloon dilatations (the last one was performed 2 weeks ago) had been performed because of esophageal stricture, which developed following intake of nitric acid (porcoz) four years ago, and the patient was being fed through a gastrostomy catheter.
A cystourethrogram demonstrated a pear shaped bladder and irregularity of the urethra: dilatation proximal and distal to two urethral strictures (Figures 3 and 4).
Isolated case reports of NSAID colopathy range from the more acute complication of inflammation and ulceration to the more chronic picture of fibrosis and stricture formation.
Biliary strictures in 130 consecutive right lobe living donor liver transplant recipients: Results of a Western Center.
sup][1] But the sensitivity and specificity of bile, blood tumor markers [sup][2] in diagnosis of malignant biliary strictures were lower, while sometimes it is very difficult for us to determine early the nature of benign and malignant biliary stenosis according to tumor markers, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), percutaneous transhepatic cholangio drainage and other imaging examination.