stricture

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Related to Strictures: Barrett esophagus, toxic megacolon

stenosis

 [stĕ-no´sis] (pl. steno´ses)
an abnormal narrowing or contraction of a body passage or opening; called also arctation, coarctation, and stricture.
aortic stenosis obstruction to the outflow of blood from the left ventricle into the aorta; in the majority of adult cases the etiology is degenerative calcific disease of the valve.
hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis) a cardiomyopathy of unknown cause, in which the left ventricle is hypertrophied and the cavity is small; it is marked by obstruction to left ventricular outflow.
mitral stenosis a narrowing of the left atrioventricular orifice (mitral valve) due to inflammation and scarring; the cause is almost always rheumatic heart disease. Normally the leaflets open with each pulsation of the heart, allowing blood to flow from the left atrium into the left ventricle, and close as the ventricle fills again so that they prevent a backward flow of blood. In mitral stenosis there is a resultant increase of pressure in the pulmonary artery and hypertrophy of the left ventricle. The usual treatment is surgical replacement of the valve.
pulmonary stenosis (PS) narrowing of the opening between the pulmonary artery and the right ventricle.
pyloric stenosis see pyloric stenosis.
renal artery stenosis narrowing of one or both renal arteries by atherosclerosis or by fibrous dysplasia or hyperplasia, so that renal function is impaired (see ischemic nephropathy). Increased renin release by the affected kidney causes renovascular hypertension, and bilateral stenosis may result in chronic renal failure.
spinal stenosis narrowing of the vertebral canal, nerve root canals, or intervertebral foramina of the lumbar spine, caused by encroachment of bone upon the space; symptoms are caused by compression of the cauda equina and include pain, paresthesias, and neurogenic claudication. The condition may be either congenital or due to spinal degeneration.
subaortic stenosis aortic stenosis due to an obstructive lesion in the left ventricle below the aortic valve, causing a pressure gradient across the obstruction within the ventricle. See also idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis.
subglottic stenosis stenosis of the trachea below the glottis. A congenital form results in neonatal stridor or laryngotracheitis, often requiring tracheotomy but resolving with age. An acquired form is caused by repeated intubations.
tracheal stenosis scarring of the trachea with narrowing, usually as a result of injury from an artificial airway or trauma.
tricuspid stenosis (TS) narrowing or stricture of the tricuspid orifice of the heart, a condition often seen in patients with severe congestive heart failure, usually the result of volume overload and pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular and tricuspid annular dilation.

stric·ture

(strik'chūr),
A circumscribed narrowing or stenosis of a hollow structure, usually consisting of cicatricial contracture or deposition of abnormal tissue.
[L. strictura, fr. stringo, pp. strictus, to draw tight, bind]

stricture

(strĭk′chər)
n.
An abnormal narrowing of a bodily duct or passage.

stricture

The closing of a luminal structure. See Biliary stricture, Esophageal stricture, Stenosis, Urethral stricture.

stric·ture

(strik'shŭr)
A circumscribed narrowing or stenosis of a tube, duct, or hollow structure, such as the esophagus or urethra, usually consisting of cicatricial contracture or deposition of abnormal tissue. May be congenital or acquired. If acquired, may result from infection, trauma, muscular spasm, or mechanical or chemical irritation.
[L. strictura, fr. stringo, pp. strictus, to draw tight, bind]

stricture

Narrowing of a body passage.

Stricture

An abnormal narrowing or tightening of a body passage. LGV can cause strictures to form in the patient's rectum, or in the vagina of female patients.
References in periodicals archive ?
By urethroscopy, no patient (0%) in group A and two patients (6.45%) in group B (6.45%) showed urethral stricture after HoLEP (Table 3, Figure 3, P=0.021).
A through the scope (TTS) uncovered colonic self-expandable metallic stent (U-SEMS) (60x26x20 mm Niti-S D type, Tae-woong Inc.; Seoul, Korea) was placed through the stricture under endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance.
The CISC has an important role in the management of recurrence of urethral strictures. Yet, it is also known that urethral stricture is quite tough condition to cure, as its recurrence rate is quite high especially in patient who have gone through endoscopic optical urethrotomy7.
Temporary placement of retrievable fully covered metallic stents versus percutaneous balloon dilation in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. J Vasc Intervent Radiol 2011; 22:893-899.
Efficacy of holmium laser urethrotomy and intralesional injection of Santosh PGI tetra-inject (Triamcinolone, Mitomycin C, Hyaluronidase and N-acetyl cysteine) on the outcome of urethral strictures. Cent European J Urol 2015;68:462-465.
Aggressive bougie dilatation and intralesional steroid injections is effective in refractory benign oesophageal strictures secondary to corrosive ingestion.
In fact, recent assessment of the cost-effectiveness of urethroplasty compared with dilatation and urethrotomy suggests that there is no advantage of doing more than one urethrotomy before proceeding to urethroplasty11,12 and if a patient has a significant stricture, then a primary urethroplasty is certainly the best treatment option.11 Majority of centres around the world follow patients at three weeks postoperatively with a pericatheter urethrogram.
The median body mass index percentile for age was 6.3, "so these were patients who were severely malnourished, probably as a result of their strictures as well as their underlying disease," Dr.
Ltd., Pyeongtaek, South Korea) for malignant disorders and benign complications (anastomosis stricture, anastomosis leak, and spontaneous fistula) affecting the upper gastrointestinal tract at the Department of Surgery, Sutcu Imam University Faculty of Medicine, Kahramanmaras and Department of Surgery, Gebze Fatih State Hospital, Izmit, Turkey.
A full thickness stricture was noted at the pre-pyloric region for a length of 2 cm (Figure 1A).
The use of double buccal mucosa grafts on the ventral and dorsal bulbar urethra, first described by Palminteri in 2008, since then had been applied only in small series to penile urethral strictures [4].