confidentiality

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confidentiality

 [kon-fĭ-den-she-al´ĭ-te]
a substantive rule in bioethics saying that the information a patient reveals to a health care provider is private and has limits on how and when it can be disclosed to a third party; usually the provider must obtain permission from the patient to make such a disclosure.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē),
The legally protected right afforded to (and duty required of) specifically designated health care professionals not to disclose information discerned or communicated during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]

confidentiality

/con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty/ (kon″fĭ-den″she-al´ĭ-te) the principle in medical ethics that the information a patient reveals to a health care provider is private and has limits on how and when it can be disclosed to a third party.

confidentiality

[kon′fiden′shē·al′itē]
1 the nondisclosure of information except to another authorized person.
2 (in research) protection of study participants such that an individual participant�s identity cannot be linked to the information provided to the researcher and is never publicly divulged.

confidentiality

Medspeak-UK
The non-disclosure of the private information of another. The state of data privacy, which is generally held under legal and ethical obligations of non-disclosure.

Patient privacy 
An implied agreement between a physician and a patient that all information related by the patient is to be held in the strictest of confidence, unless it is illegal and/or dangerous to society.

Psychiatry
The ethical principle that a physician may not reveal any information disclosed in the course of medical care, unless the patient who disclosed that information poses a threat to him/herself or others. Psychiatrists need a lower disclosure threshold, because they may see patients in their practice who are mentally volatile and potentially dangerous.

confidentiality

Psychiatry The ethical principle that a physician may not reveal any information disclosed in the course of medical care. See Anne Sexton, Bennett-Leahy bill, Doctor-patient relationship, Hippocratic Oath, Malpractice, Privilege, Privileged communication.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē)
The statutorily protected right and duty of health professionals not to disclose information acquired during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]

confidentiality

The principle which protects the right of patients to expect that details of their medical conditions should be divulged only to those who need to know them for medical purposes.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē)
The legally protected right afforded to (and duty required of) specifically designated health care professionals not to disclose information discerned or communicated during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]

confidentiality,

n the nondisclosure of certain information except to another authorized person.

confidentiality

secrecy relating to information. All clinical data have a degree of confidentiality, the level varying with the information and the circumstances.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the physician offers assurances that she would be able to keep that information in strict confidence.
That same law ensures that all information collected in the Residential Finance Survey will be held in strict confidence and seen only by sworn Bureau of the Census employees.
Tors and external energy auditorsthis information will be used in strict confidence with company names and all personal information removed.
Canon Hughes, who now lives at Wark, Cornhill on Tweed, said: "I was astonished to receive a letter which began 'the Prime Minister has asked me to inform you, in strict confidence, that having accepted the advice of the Head of the Civil Service and the Main Honours Committee, he proposes to submit your name to the Queen.
Perhaps it has to do with the strict confidence policy traditionally followed by Yash Raj Films, producers of Dhoom 3, but Katrina preferred to speak only about the product she had come to unveil.
Paula Bridge, the head of the clinical negligence team at Ralli, and solicitor to the Rafferty family said: "Anyone who attended the Rysseldene Surgery with a similar complaint and has any concerns at all, can contact me in strict confidence.
He gave assurance that all information gathered during consultation would be kept in strict confidence and evaluated in accordance with existing rules and regulations governing the employment of seafarers and POEA standard terms and conditions.
ANYONE interested can contact Mark Jones in strict confidence on 07753 966805.
You can ring in strict confidence on 0800 40 50 40 quoting 421 15/7/11 or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.
In strict confidence, between you and me, since my lovable little Ronan didn't win BGT 'cos of all them porkies in the papers about a fix, I thought, maybe time for something new.
I would therefore appeal to anyone who knows someone who has suffered burns since the early hours of the morning of Monday or who has information which they believe can assist the investigation, to come forward in strict confidence.
I can assure that such disclosures will be treated in strict confidence," he added.