hyperglycemia

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hyperglycemia

 [hi″per-gli-se´me-ah]
excess of glucose in the blood; see also diabetes mellitus.

hy·per·gly·ce·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-glī-sē'mē-ă),
An abnormally high concentration of glucose in the circulating blood, seen especially in patients with diabetes mellitus.
Synonym(s): hyperglycosemia
[hyper- + G. glykys, sweet, + haima, blood]

hyperglycemia

(hī′pər-glī-sē′mē-ə)
n.
The presence of an abnormally high concentration of glucose in the blood.

hy′per·gly·ce′mic (-mĭk) adj.

hyperglycemia

Metabolism An abnormal ↑ in serum glucose, most commonly due to DM. See Diabetes mellitus, Glucose tolerance test, Hyperglycinemia.

hy·per·gly·ce·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-glī-sē'mē-ă)
An abnormally high concentration of glucose in the blood, a feature of diabetes mellitus.
Synonym(s): hyperglycaemia.
[hyper- + G. glykys, sweet, + haima, blood]

Hyperglycemia

Condition characterized by excessively high levels of glucose in the blood, and occurs when the body does not have enough insulin or cannot use the insulin it does have to turn glucose into energy. Hyperglycemia is often indicative of diabetes that is out of control.

hy·per·gly·ce·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-glī-sē'mē-ă)
Abnormally high concentration of glucose in the circulating blood, seen in diabetes mellitus.
Synonym(s): hyperglycaemia.
[hyper- + G. glykys, sweet, + haima, blood]
References in periodicals archive ?
Nie, "Impact of stress hyperglycemia on in-hospital stent thrombosis and prognosis in nondiabetic patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing a primary percutaneous coronary intervention," Coronary Artery Disease, vol.
Patients with stress hyperglycemia had a significantly higher sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) score than patients with normal glycemia (mean 4.9 vs.
Keywords: Stress Hyperglycemia, Ischemic stroke, Non-diabetic, Mortality.
in 2004, had shown that non-diabetic ischemic stroke patients having stress hyperglycemia on admission (using 200 mg/dl as the threshold for labeling hyperglycemia) had a short term mortality of 44% while it was 20% in normoglycemic ischemic stroke patients3.
The detrimental effect of stress hyperglycemia on outcome in ischemic stroke patients has led to the idea that higher glucose level reduction by aggressive treatment with insulin may improve the outcome in these patients.
Stress hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose level more than 155 mg/dl at the time of admission or after 24, 48 and 72 hours of admission4.
Group I (control/Unexposed group) consisted of patients who were normoglycemic on admission or over next 72 hours and Group II (cohort/exposed group) included patients with stress hyperglycemia. A written informed consent was taken from every patient who was included in the study.
Secondly, although a single definition of stress hyperglycemia has yet not been agreed upon in non-diabetic patients, but it is even more difficult in diabetic patients as unstressed baseline level of glucose is not known and it may be different in different patients15.
There is still no consensus that what blood glucose level should be used to label as stress hyperglycemia. We have used a cutoff of 155mg/dl because one study found that blood glucose level more than this resulted in poor prognosis.
In an analysis of stress hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients receiving TPN, participants who received dextrose at rates higher than 4 mg/kg/min had a 50% chance of developing hyperglycemia (Schloerb & Henning, 1998).
In a systematic overview of 32 studies, Capes, Hunt, Malmberg, Pathak, and Gerstein (2001) concluded that stress hyperglycemia upon hospital admission was associated with poor functional recovery.
Risk Factors for the Development of Stress Hyperglycemia in Critical Illness Factor Major mechanism Preexisting diabetes Insulin deficiency (relative or absolute) mellitus Infusion of catecholamine Insulin resistance pressor (i.e., epinephrine and norepinephrine) Glucocorticoid therapy Insulin resistance Obesity Insulin resistance Increasing Acute Higher counterregulatory hormone levels Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) score Older age Insulin deficiency Sepsis Insulin resistance Hypothermia Insulin deficiency Hypoxemia Insulin deficiency Uremia Insulin resistance Cirrhosis Insulin resistance Reprinted from: Critical Care Clinics of North America, vol.