takotsubo cardiomyopathy

(redirected from Stress cardiomyopathy)
A non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy most common in post-menopausal women, which is characterised by a sudden temporary weakening of the myocardium triggered by physical or emotional stress—e.g., death of a loved one—hence the alternate term, broken heart syndrome
Pathogenesis High serum catecholamines—adrenaline/ epinephrine
Diagnosis Negative coronary angiogram
Prognosis If the individual survives the initial event, the left ventricular function improves within 2 months

takotsubo cardiomyopathy

Reversible dysfunction of the left ventricle. It may be the cause of transient heart failure that occurs after exceptionally stressful events. The heart in such instances takes on a rounded shape with a narrow neck, resembling a traditional Japanese lobster trap (takotsubo). It is informally called broken-heart syndrome.
Synonym: apical ballooning syndrome; stress-induced cardiomyopathy; transient left ventricular apical ballooning
See also: cardiomyopathy
References in periodicals archive ?
According to his research, cannabis users who had an episode of stress cardiomyopathy were significantly more likely to go into cardiac arrest or need correction to abnormal heart rhythms than non-users.
Active users of marijuana may be doubling their risk of stress cardiomyopathy, a malfunction of the heart muscle malfunction that can mimic the symptoms of a heart attack, a new study has found.
Stress cardiomyopathy mimics signs of a heart attack, resulting in chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness and sometimes fainting.
Acute stress cardiomyopathy and reversible left ventricular dysfunction.
But you're not having a heart attack; this nightmare scenario is called Takotsubo syndrome, aka stress cardiomyopathy, aka stunned myocardium syndrome, and is exceedingly rare.
The prevalence of stress cardiomyopathy, or broken-heart syndrome, is about 10 percent of women and 2 percent to 3 percent of the general population among those who are admitted to the emergency room with a suspected heart attack.
The syndrome was renamed stress cardiomyopathy in 2006.
Researchers analysed 256 stress cardiomyopathy patients in seven tertiary care centers in both Europe and North America over the course of five years.
Broken heart or takotsubo syndrome: support for the neurohumoral hypothesis of stress cardiomyopathy.
Stress cardiomyopathy mimicking acute coronary syndrome: case presentation and review of the literature.
Broken heart syndrome is also known as takotsubo cardiomyopathy, stress cardiomyopathy, left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, or ampulla-shaped cardiomyopathy.
Recently a few cases of concomitant stress cardiomyopathy with obstructive airway disease have been documented in literature.