strangles

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strangles

(strang'gĕlz),
A highly contagious condition of horses resulting from infection with Streptococcus equi subsp. equi. Abbreviated taxonomy: Bacteria; Firmicutes; Lactobacillales; Streptococcaceae; Streptoccus; Streptococcus equi. Lymphadenopathy, especially of mandibular, parotid, and retropharyngeal lymph nodes; may abscess and impinge on the airways (thus the familiar name, which is derived from the verb strangle); causes mucopurulent nasal discharge, anemia, cough, can progress to lower airway infection, and may recrudesce months later as mesenteric lymphadenopathy with abscessation (so-called bastard strangles) and lead to signs of colic. A vaccine is available.

strangles

(străng′gəlz)
pl.n. (used with a sing. verb)
An infectious disease of horses and related animals, caused by the bacterium Streptococcus equi and characterized by inflammation of the nasal mucous membrane and abscesses under the jaw and around the throat that cause a strangling or choking sensation.
A form of restraint used to subdue overactive, unruly, violent, or inebriated subjects to prevent them from harming themselves and others, which consists of occluding the upper airway by compressing the thyroid cartilage and displacing the tongue posteriorly; the choke hold is more dangerous than the carotid sleeper, which cuts off the flow of blood to the brain, but does not compromise the airways
References in periodicals archive ?
Boivin, "A case of disseminated infection caused by Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus," Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology, vol.
Naturally occurring persistent and asymptomatic infection of the guttural pouches of horses with Streptococcus equi. Vet Rec 140: 84-90.
Prevalence and serum protein values of strangles (Streptococcus equi) affected mules at Remount Depot, Sargodha (Pakistan).
The cultural examination of pus and nasal discharge revealed [beta]-hemolytic, gram positive, mucoid colonies of Streptococcus equi on blood agar.
The epidemiologic and immunologic characterization Streptococcus equi in foals (Thesis).
Streptococcus equi, the causative agent of equine strangles, is shed in nasal discharges and pus from lymph nodes of affected animals.
Caused by the bacterium Streptococcus equi, strangles has many unpleasant effects including abscessed lymph nodes of the head and neck, which can in severe cases restrict the airway, leading to the name 'strangles'.
It can cause difficulty with swallowing and breathing, and lead to death if the bacterium streptococcus equi spreads to other parts of the horse's body.

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