strait

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strait

 [strāt]
a narrow passage.
s's of the pelvis the pelvic inlet(superior pelvic strait) and pelvic outlet(inferior pelvic strait).

strait

(strāt),
[M.E. streit thr. O. Fr. fr. L. strictus, drawn together, tight]

strait

(strāt)
A narrow passageway: inferior strait, apertura pelvis inferior; superior strait, apertura pelvis superior.
[M.E. streit thr. O. Fr. fr. L. strictus, drawn together, tight]
References in periodicals archive ?
They said the strait-jacket symbolised the stigma which restricted many mentally ill people.
PRESTON thought about putting David Healy in a strait-jacket before this game after his midweek antics in Cardiff.
SHOPPERS gasped as a Warwickshire escapologist freed himself from a strait-jacket as he hung 80ft in the air in a shopping centre.
Exclusion from such constraints may turn out to be like escaping from an economic strait-jacket.
When one optimistic Toon Army member asked a bookie at half time "What would you give me for a 4-4 draw?" the response was "a strait-jacket''.
Unfortunately, teacher training has also succumbed to the Ofsted/Teacher Development Agency strait-jacket, students are expected to tick a narrowly defined set of competencies.
Three months on, we should recognise that David Miliband has cast off any Blairite strait-jacket, with an agenda that leaves behind the many failures of New Labour, while retaining its strengths.
Ian Todd and Tom Bennett, who together form comedy duo Strait-jacket, say their daily trips on the Metro are the inspiration for their latest sketches, which are set to be aired at an exclusive comedy event in New York in the United States tomorrow.
His overly cautious tactics left one dimensional Boro stifled in a strait-jacket of scientific professionalism that rejected the notion that the game was an entertainment.
It was a big relief then when Big Brovaz burst onto the stage wearing feather epaulettes, carnival masks and one of the male artistes sported half a strait-jacket. At least they didn't make me want to sob uncontrollably.
Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach and Franz Benda, both employed by Frederick the Great in Potsdam, were desperately trying to break away from what had become a baroque strait-jacket of musical uniformity, creating instead sound-worlds which, in the words of Pavlo Beznosiuk, genial director of the AAM, promised us a "rather frenetic evening of avant-garde music - for the 1760s".