work hardening

(redirected from Strain hardening)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Strain hardening: Cold working

work hardening

 
a rehabilitation program designed to restore functional and work capacities to the injured worker through application of graded work simulation. Included are activities designed to improve overall physical condition, including strength, endurance, and coordination specific to work activity, as well as means for coping with any remaining symptoms from the original problem, such as pain. Central to all work hardening programs is the reproduction of a work-like environment where tasks are designed to improve the patient's tolerance for productive work.



The goal of work hardening is to achieve an acceptable level of productivity for returning to one's former occupation or for meeting the demands of a specific new type of work. Therefore, worker behaviors and not just physical conditioning are addressed. These include having structured work times and duties, dressing appropriately for one's tasks, and conducting oneself in a worker-like manner. It is important to differentiate work hardening from work conditioning, which does not address these added concerns.
Treatment Personnel. Work hardening is generally administered by physical or occupational therapists, working independently or as part of a team, which might include physicians, vocational counselors, psychologists, and other rehabilitation professionals. Drug and alcohol specialists, ergonomists, orthotists, dieticians, and industrial nurses may also be involved in the program.
Settings. Work hardening programs can be found in rehabilitation and general acute hospitals, private physical or occupational therapy centers, vocational training facilities, and fully dedicated facilities or within private industry. When found in hospitals or therapy centers, programs either share space with other rehabilitation programs (mixed-use setting) or are in partitioned areas designed specifically for the purpose (dedicated space setting). Fully dedicated facilities, whose only use is work hardening activity, are generally thought to offer the best environment for worker rehabilitation since they provide the nearest reproduction of actual work experience.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

work hard·en·ing

(wŏrk hahr'dĕn-ing)
A multidisciplinary program where actual work tasks are performed to rehabilitate an injured worker in preparation for a return to the job.
See also: work conditioning
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

work hard·en·ing

(wŏrk hahr'dĕn-ing)
A multidisciplinary progam where actual work tasks are performed to rehabilitate an injured worker. The focus of therapy is to stimulate a regular work routine where therapy is regimented as a precursor to return to work.
See also: work conditioning
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The stress-strain behaviors of samples change from strain hardening to strain softening with dry density increasing.
Dual phase-steels exhibit of strain hardening effect, i.e.
The Strain Hardening Method allows that time to be slashed to a few hours, requiring a simple tensile test at 80AC.
Two ways to accomplish the objective include (1) adding wall thickness and (2) developing tube and fitting processes that would enhance strain hardening while minimizing deformation due to increased hoop stress.
The computer model of "Program Cabut-Serat Fraktur" represents the fracture phenomenon during the pull-out process, that is four stages of initial pre-slip, slip, transition, and strain hardening.
Strain hardening curves (see Figures 4 and 5 in No.4, 2007) of BJ are supplemented with results of the fractography investigation of fractures of respective specimens [11].
When the polymer is considered linear, meaning that the polymer chains are free from any branch points, the stretching of the sample will be uniform and no strain hardening is observed because the chains are not prevented from slipping over each other.
This difference could be due to the differences in strain hardening of octene based EAO copolymers versus butene based EAO copolymers, it has been postulated that this increase in strain hardening (i.e., slope of strain hardening) is due to differences in the amount of tie chain molecules.
In cyclic loading, the Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain relationship for the strain hardening exponent (n) and the strength coefficient (K) typically changes as the material hardens, or softens, until a stable state is reestablished.
This method is applied to both strain hardening and strain rate dependent materials.
Recent work at the U.K.'s University of Reading and elsewhere has shown that bread doughs exhibit strain hardening in large deformations, such as bubble expansion.