stimulus-response

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stimulus-response

the key mechanism within the animal which permits it to adapt as perfectly as possible to its environment.

stimulus-response apparatus
a receptor region responding directly to a stimulus, e.g. sound, touch, smell, vision, an afferent neuron which conveys the stimulus towards the central nervous system, a synapse where the afferent path meets the efferent path, an efferent neuron conveying stimuli from the CNS, and an effector (a muscle, gland or neurosecretory cell).
References in periodicals archive ?
This section includes chapters discussing various support methods, such as social support and a stimulus-response model.
The theories that studied the effects of mass communication thought the influences on the behavior of receiver must be seen through the stimulus-response model, in which every message always has an effect on public.
The behaviorist stimulus-response model that explains the strong direct influences of media on the audience is one of Lasswell's schema extensions.
The "two-step flow" theory dismisses such direct influence on the audience, denies that public is amorphous and undifferentiated, and also changes the role of the audience in receiving the message, considering that it is not passive as it was in the stimulus-response model.
Advertising is not a stimulus in the outmoded behavioral psychology stimulus-response model of human information processing.
In this sense, the immune system works like a group of Talmudic scholars arguing with each before finally reaching a decision, rather than like Pavlov's simple stimulus-response model.
The first describes Skinner's contributions to a science of behavior ("a stimulus-response model with no stimulus") and controversies arising from them (e.
However, while the stimulus-response model assumes that the correct stimulus from the salesperson can cause a response in the customer, the model does not exclude the possibility that such responses may be emotional in content, and that it is these emotions which cause overt behaviours.
Specific measures of effectiveness were organized with a stimulus-response model based on the work of Hecht (1978a, 1978b, 1978c).
The stimulus-response model (based on Hecht, 1978c) indicates that message characteristics (positive emphasis and you-attitude) should influence message reception (perceived tone), that message reception should influence yielding (commitment to act in accord with the message), and that message reception and yielding (the internal responses and the links between then) should influence the reader's feeling of satisfaction.
The stimulus-response model also indicates that implicit reinforcement provided by the message (benefits and threats) should encourage commitment and, by reinforcing commitment, also reinforce all intermittent links between the stimulus and the response (that is, reinforce the message-to-reception link, the reception response, the reception-to-yielding link, and the yielding response).
All interactive software is based on a stimulus-response model and should be built upon sound principles of cognitive psychology.