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Still

(stil),
George F., English physician, 1868-1941. See: Still disease, Still murmur, Still-Chauffard syndrome.

still,

n an apparatus used for steam or water distillation. It comprises a vessel that contains water and aromatic plant material, a condenser that cools the vapor produced from heating the plant material, and a receiver for collecting the condensed products.
References in periodicals archive ?
and p when Ge erman journalists who write about Stille Hilfe remark on the power she now wields in the organisation.
The new Stille imagiQ2 OR table delivers maximum precision, reduces radiation exposure and, with its high level of flexibility, is ideal for use in hybrid operating rooms.
Goran Stille and Pat Hanlon from Handelsbanken, which has plans to expand in the Midlands
In the second section of Benevolence and Betrayal, Stille brings to the stage the Foas of Turin, many of whom were active antifascists.
Michael Chong and graduate student Kevin Kells from the University of Waterloo have reported conditions under which the Stille coupling occurs on an extremely interesting substrate.
In similar mode, Hyunseon Lee looks at Stille Zeile Sechs against the backdrop of the wave of autobiographies, confessional writing, and overt self-justifications which followed the collapse of the GDR.
Stille takes us on a whirlwind tour of the world's natural and cultural resources, from the most prominent, such as the Sphinx and pyramids of Egypt, to the exotic, such as wood carving in the East Indies.
Antes de la Navidad de 1965, nos enseno a cantar la Stille Nacht.
Alexander Stille reports that the nation's textbook authors have acquired an unwanted editor: the Texas Board of Education.
Schulz used without credit a phrase that originally appeared in an article by Alexander Stille in our November 29 issue.
Rereading the story of Odysseus in Botho Strauss's version and in the original, it is amazing that the German classical era was so dominated by Winckelmann's "edler Einfalt und stille Grosse" that the wanton cruelty could be overlooked.