Stiles


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Stiles

(stīlz),
Walter S., English physicist, 1901-1985. See: Stiles-Crawford effect.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
I descended at once to the churchyard, and crossed the stile which led directly to Mrs.
SO that at the bottom of the hill when they came to the stile, there was nothing left to carry except Lucie's one little bundle.
LUCIE scrambled up the stile with the bundle in her hand; and then she turned to say "Good-night," and to thank the washer-woman-- But what a VERY odd thing!
I saw him high in the air, pigeon-winging it to admiration just over the top of the stile; and of course I thought it an unusually singular thing that he did not continue to go over.
This was finally fortunate; the horse was re-established, and the dog was silenced with a "Down, Pilot!" The traveller now, stooping, felt his foot and leg, as if trying whether they were sound; apparently something ailed them, for he halted to the stile whence I had just risen, and sat down.
Huck was irritated to think he had been such a goose and betrayed such a suspicious excitement, for he had dropped the idea that the parcel brought from the tavern was the treasure, as soon as he had heard the talk at the widow's stile. He had only thought it was not the treasure, however -- he had not known that it wasn't -- and so the suggestion of a captured bundle was too much for his self-possession.
So he turned and left Robin and, crossing the stile, was gone, but Robin heard him singing from beyond the hedge as he strode away:
The walking party had crossed the lane, and were surmounting an opposite stile, and the Admiral was putting his horse in motion again, when Captain Wentworth cleared the hedge in a moment to say something to his sister.
"I have walked hundreds of miles this past summer, painting these texes on every wall, gate, and stile the length and breadth of this district.
When they passed the stile again the lovers were still there, but now they were not speaking; they were in one another's arms, and the man's lips were pressed against the girl's.
Presently Jo said very soberly, as she sat down on the step of the stile, "Laurie, I want to tell you something."
And when the difficulties of the stile were at last surmounted, and they once more entered on the open field, old Wardle informed Mr.