stilbene

(redirected from Stilbenes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to Stilbenes: resveratrol, Flavonoids

stil·bene

(stil'bēn),
1. an unsaturated hydrocarbon, the nucleus of stilbestrol and other synthetic estrogenic compounds.
2. A class of compounds based on stilbene (1).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stil·bene

(stil'bēn)
1. An unsaturated hydrocarbon, the nucleus of stilbestrol and other synthetic estrogenic compounds.
2. A class of compounds based on stilbene (1).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Resveratrol or 3,5,4-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene is classified into phytoalexin, a phenolic compound in the stilbene family with trans- form which is being more recurrent in processing greater bioactivity (Wenzel & Somoza, 2005) and is manufactured naturally by knotweeds, pine trees, grape vines, peanut plants, cocoa bushes, including: blueberries, raspberries, mulberries, cranberries, and bilberries (Jasinski et al., 2013).
Ortega, "Role of natural stilbenes in the prevention of cancer," Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, vol.
The resveratrol is one of the most important natural stilbenes that has demonstrated having health promoter properties in possessing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotector, antidiabetic, anticancerous, chemoprotector, and neuroprotector effects [83].
Sicilian Malvasia wines have high levels of natural phenolic compounds (stilbenes and flavonoids) that represent a potential preventive antioxidant factor [6].
Skovronsky, "18F stilbenes and styrylpyridines for PET imaging of A[beta] plaques in Alzheimer's disease: a miniperspective," Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, vol.
Okamoto et al., "Bis-phosphorylbridged stilbenes synthesized by an intramolecular cascade cyclization," Organic Letters, vol.
Rosen, "Isolation and identification of stilbenes in two varieties of Polygonum cuspidatum," Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.
These molecules can be sub-classified into flavonoids, phenolic acids, tannins, and stilbenes (Figure 1).
Thus, the synthesis of stilbenes, isoflavones, phenolic acids and flavonoids are induced by the regulation of specific genes, which are activated after bunch thinning, inducing transcriptomic changes in berries, especially at the end of the stage that delimits changes in color and softening of grapes (PASTORE et al., 2011).
hydroxyflavonoids [20]; 1,085 [cm.sup.-1], related to C--O groups of flavonoids and terpenes and to O--H groups of fatty acids, stilbenes, steroids, carboxylic acids [45] and secondary alcohols [44]; 945 [cm.sup.-1], related to wagging -C[H.sub.2] of monoterpenes [47]; 878 [cm.sup.-1], related to the C--H wagging vibration of phenolic compounds [47] or to aromatic ring vibration [46].
They encompass a number of classes of compounds, including isoflavones, lignans, coumestans, stilbenes, and prenylflavanoids.
(1,4,5,8,10) There are a plethora of other nonflavonoid polyphenols, many of which confer health benefits, including stilbenes (such as resveratrol, found in red wine), lignans (such as enterodiol, found in flaxseed and flaxseed oil), lignins (found in green beans, carrots, peas, and Brazil nuts), and phenolic acids, such as hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids, among which caffeic and ferulic acids are often present in foods.